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House buying and selling possible pitfalls?

(7 Posts)
Herschellmum Tue 17-Jan-17 12:29:15

I am one of those people who nothing ever goes smoothly for, it's a bit of a joke amongst people who know me, it's like if it's going to go wrong it will and it's usually on a grand scale 😂

An example would be putting out house up for sale, contacted agents to come and see property and then massive water leak that meant ceiling and floors had to be replaced etc. And delayed putting it up for sale for 7 months, which went up the day of the EU vote and resulted in new viewings for months.

Anyhoo ... we had a cash offer, accepted, someone died near my mums, put a note though the door, they called showed us house, make a cheeky offer and it was accepted. All good, contacted solictors, filled in mass amounts of paper work, sent off, got a mortgage in principle, all good, surveys in both houses done; no problems we know of, mortgage Happy to proceed and sent out full mortgage paper work to use and solicitor.

So what is still left to go wrong?

I am assuming a lot but we can't figure how what, nothing's ever gone smoothly and everyone I know who sold recently has massive issues, so I'm trying to prepare for the worse! 😂

PurpleDaisies Tue 17-Jan-17 12:31:39

Until you've actually exchanged contracts you can still lose your buyer or your seller can change their minds.

Is there anyone above you in the chain?

JT05 Tue 17-Jan-17 12:47:24

Unfortunately until you exchange nothing is certain. Local searches can bring up issues that stall a sale - drainage, flooding, future planning issues.

Our sale was delayed because of a tree with a TPO. It wasn't on our land or anything to do with us, but the buyers solicitor wanted proof and seemed incapable of obtaining it. We ended up sorting it ourselves.

Herschellmum Tue 17-Jan-17 13:02:54

Thanks both!

No chain.

We have the contact signed but not dated it! 😂

pdunne Tue 17-Jan-17 20:36:10

If you're buying the house of someone who's died, the person who's selling it to you obtaining the grant of probate (effectively permission to act on behalf of the estate) and proving to your solicitor that they have it could take a while.

Our seller did have the grant (there's a government website you can check), but couldn't seem to find it for two months!

pdunne Tue 17-Jan-17 20:36:13

If you're buying the house of someone who's died, the person who's selling it to you obtaining the grant of probate (effectively permission to act on behalf of the estate) and proving to your solicitor that they have it could take a while.

Our seller did have the grant (there's a government website you can check), but couldn't seem to find it for two months!

Herschellmum Sat 21-Jan-17 11:37:58

Thanks all, it's all getting fairly stressful. My solicitor is shocking! We have no idea what the heck is happening my buyers solicitors keeps asking a million questions despite the fact the actually buyer is happy to proceed, I'm just getting a bit edgy.

I asked a questions about the house we are buying and the solicitor said he acted like nothing has been started. We are supposed to be moving in less than a month.

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