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Kitchen plugs - how many?

(8 Posts)
wallywobbles Sun 17-Apr-16 14:33:45

We are looking at the electrics for our kitchen to be as we are going to need to get this sorted very soon for the first fix.

Its a open plan kitchen living area, we have 17 plugs for the kitchen and 12 for the living area, total area 60m2 with 29 plugs. I'm not including the hob and oven. DP thinks I've gone overboard, I think this maybe not enough.

Can anyone tell me what they have or are using, and is it enough? Thanks

1 Mixer
1 Kenwood
1 Bread machine
1 Oven
1 Microwave
1 Dishwasher
1 Fridge
1 Kettle
1 Coffee Machine
1 Toaster
1 Hob
4 for the bar
2 on opposite wall for hoovering
2 by kitchen table for raclette etc
6 understairs for desk
4 Corner of fireplace
2 for hoover/lamp far corner of room
2 for aga + pump

RaisingSteam Sun 17-Apr-16 18:03:17

I thought that sounded over the top but I've just counted and our kitchen diner (wired by DH) has I think 10 double sockets plus a hidden plug for dishwasher and the cooker socket which is a 30 amp or something. Easy for you to put them in now though than add later, every socket should be a double.

Nowadays I'd put in some USB charging sockets somewhere, and think about putting Cat5 (phone/tv/internet) around the house.
Technology needs masses of sockets - we have about 5 or 6 devices charged every night.

Lounge we are using loads of extension leads as it hasn't been rewired and only has four double sockets.
TV/DVD/Wii
Hifi tuner/phone/wifi router
Desk light/computer/printer
Few table/floor lamps
Few "hoovering" sockets.

I think you are on the right lines!

PigletJohn Sun 17-Apr-16 20:25:22

You mean sockets.

Have the ring or radial run horizontally, chased into the wall, all round the room, at about 200mm above worktop level. Have it run in oval conduit (this is because it is relatively easy to cut into and add another outlet in future, if necessary)

At each position where you plan to have, or might one day want, an electrical appliance, have a 20A switch, feeding an unswitched socket below. Where you want a high-level outlet, for example for a cooker hood, TV, extractor fan, microwave or outside light, put an FCU feeding a flex outlet above (above eye level where you will not notice it). You can feed a hood or fan from a socket outlet, but it is shoddy.

Spread double sockets along the horizontal row, spaced no more than one metre apart.

If it is a k/diner or a room where there is a sitting area where no worktop is planned, have a double socket close to each corner; on each side of patio doors, french windows, fireplaces or other features; and at intervals of no more than two metres along each wall. It will look slightly neater if they are equally spaced.

You will be surprised that there are no particular regulations about sockets and sinks, but sockets should not be placed where they can be splashed or dripped on by taps and sinks, including sinks that overflow. It is very poor to have a socket or switch in a cupboard or otherwise hidden, since an onlooker will not be able to quickly turn it off in an emergency.

If you can afford it, it is preferable to have the kitchen circuit on an RCBO, and your freezer on a separate, dedicated circuit. Both these steps will reduce the cost and inconvenience of losing power to everything in a breaker trips.

The room which has the washer and drier in it should have its own circuit because the load is so heavy.

JustBeingJuliet Sun 17-Apr-16 22:54:17

Have as many as you can physically fit in the room! I moved from a rented, modern place with 14 plugs in the kitchen, to this house I've bought which has 3 double sockets. None below worktop level, so I have extension plugs everywhere and I'm dreaming of the day I can afford my new kitchen, complete with hundreds of sockets!

PigletJohn Sun 17-Apr-16 23:02:39

"as many as you can physically fit "

AnnieOnnieMouse Sun 17-Apr-16 23:18:24

Small kitchen - 4 doubles, a single socket attached to the oven switch, plus hidden ones for fridge, dishwasher, hob, cooker hood, which has an extra socket which used to power a router. I still wish I had an extra double.

citychick Sun 17-Apr-16 23:28:45

pigletjohn

grin

JustBeingJuliet Sun 17-Apr-16 23:31:45

grin

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