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Help! Advice please on split/broken purlin

(6 Posts)
KentonArcher Fri 13-Nov-15 13:01:30

We have a Victorian terraced house (1896) and whilst in the loft the other day, DP noticed a split in the beam that supports the roof - we've since learned this is called a purlin smile.

I fear this must be quite serious and will need sorting out but of course as always when something goes wrong with the house, the home insurance won't cover it and we're stony broke sad.

Can anyone offer advice on the best trades person to fix this (roofer, structural engineer, carpenter, etc)? And can it be repaired rather than replaced which I'm guessing would be cheaper?

A bit of googling tells me that this is quite common with these houses (we've been here 13 years) so has anyone else experience of having work done on your purlins?

Thank you in advance,

Anastasie Fri 13-Nov-15 13:05:16

No, but we did have our loft boarded and where there was a strength issue they used hangers/metal plates that attached to both parts and reinforced the strength iyswim

I would get a surveyor to have a gander and suggest something. I very much doubt it will involve removing the offending bit, but might well mean some reinforcement.

Anastasie Fri 13-Nov-15 13:06:59

building control at the council might be able to come and look? Free advice smile but if not then a structural surveyor for advice and any builder or chippy can do it I imagine.

You basically want to know the building/roof won't fall in and meets regulations.

KentonArcher Fri 13-Nov-15 13:31:52

Thank you Anastasie, that helps.

Just spoken to my DP who works for the LA, he's managed to speak to someone he knows in their planning department who has also advised a structural surveyor come and have a look.

And yes, just want to know that the roof isn't about to fall on our heads!

DickDewy Sat 14-Nov-15 23:41:20

Could it be braced rather than replaced?

wonkylegs Sat 14-Nov-15 23:44:41

It can probably be braced to strengthen it, depending on the damage.
Surveyor then a roofer.

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