Talk me through my options for my mouldy wooden worktop...

(15 Posts)
NoelEdmondsHighFlyingTurds Tue 28-Jul-15 18:32:55

We have birch worktops which I have been oiling but there's still a grey mottled patch by the tap. Is there a sort of oil that is better than the rest at protecting? Should I varnish it instead?

PolterGoose Wed 29-Jul-15 09:04:11

Sand it back and apply Osmo hard wax oil, it's the best.

NoelEdmondsHighFlyingTurds Wed 29-Jul-15 09:23:11

Thanks Polter, there are so many oils on the market, it's hard to know what's best. Have read good things about Osmo, Fiddes and Treatex, have you tried either of those other two?

Thistledew Wed 29-Jul-15 09:38:41

I treated around my sink and tap with wood hardener- the type of stuff that you would use to treat external woodwork that had become soft from exposure to the elements. Stopped any softening in its tracks.

NoelEdmondsHighFlyingTurds Wed 29-Jul-15 09:50:07

That's interesting. Did you then oil on top? Did you sand out the blackened parts first?

PolterGoose Wed 29-Jul-15 09:56:24

I started with whatever oil the kitchen firm used which was good, but then tried Osmo and was blown away really, it is pretty impervious. But, yes, sand away as much black as you can. It's not usually mould, it's a chemical reaction/oxidisation I think.

PigletJohn Wed 29-Jul-15 10:14:09

you can get Oxalic Acid crystals from places that sell fancy wood things. It bleaches out the black stains. If it goes too pale you can use Colron Wood Dye to colour it.

PigletJohn Wed 29-Jul-15 10:18:03

www.ebay.co.uk/sch/Woodworking-/3126/i.html?_from=R40&_nkw=oxalic+acid

or big bottles much cheaper from yottie shops.

It is poisonous.

NoelEdmondsHighFlyingTurds Wed 29-Jul-15 10:40:55

Yottie?

I won't mind if it bleaches it out, my efforts at sanding it out have lightened that area anyway, I'd rather it look too pale than mouldy! It's disguised a little by the windowsill anyway.

NoelEdmondsHighFlyingTurds Wed 29-Jul-15 10:48:09

Aaah, yachting!

Yes, my local yachtery has a few products with oxalic acid in it, so I'm going to have a chat with him later.

Then, assuming I get the black out, give me tips for the Osmo oil application. I really want to get it right this time!

NoelEdmondsHighFlyingTurds Fri 31-Jul-15 14:29:47

Managed to get some Liberon Wood Bleach, but it isn't doing anything on the damp marks angry. It has minimised a small burn mark though.

How many wood bleach treatments should I do, Piglet?

PigletJohn Fri 31-Jul-15 17:15:50

might there be oil preventing the bleach from soaking in?

I would expect to see a noticeable improvement after one treatment. You can dab it on with a small brush.

I don't remember how long it took when I had black water stains on hardwood doorsteps, but I did sand and dye them before re-oiling.

Liberon has a good reputation.

NoelEdmondsHighFlyingTurds Fri 31-Jul-15 17:28:31

I did sand it before applying the bleach, but maybe I need to do more. Seems weird that the burn marks where I didn't sand have definitely improved, but there's barely any change to the damp marks.

I've seen a product by Barretine that's a fungicide, should I try that, or just make my peace with the grey patch and oil over it? Was going to use Osmo wood protector followed by Fiddes hard wax oil.

PigletJohn Fri 31-Jul-15 17:50:07

Opinions differ. I use a wood preserver on wood that might get damp, because there are some fungal stains and rots that will grow if damp. Other people say that the black marks are just caused by the water.

AFAIK most people don't use fungicides on kitchen worktops, presumably thinking that it will not get, and stay, damp enough to need them.

You could ask Liberon or Osmo advice desk.

RaisingSteam Fri 31-Jul-15 18:18:04

Applying hardwax oil: Bare wood, sanded. Two thin coats, I wipe on with a cloth for small areas or use a brush for large areas. Maybe 3 coats if it doesn't feel "sealed" enough after the 2nd.
If you put it on too thick it doesn't dry well. Anyway there should be instructions on the tin.

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