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How do I find out who owns a piece of land....

(6 Posts)
SunsetSongster Sun 11-Nov-12 12:30:43

.... or even if it exists!

I've noticed on planning applications maps etc. there seems to be a thin strip of land which separates our garden from the one at the end which looks like it would be an access route for the houses (it links with the main road). However, our garden just backs onto the other one and there is only a fence in between.

I tried looking on the land registry site to see if I could work out what it was and I did find some deeds for land which were owned by Barratt homes (who built the development) but as there was no map I can't say for sure it matches the strip I am talking about. There is also a right of way path which ends before our house not very far away so it could be for that.

Anyway, if we were to extend our house (or more importantly anyone who bought our house as it is on the market) there is no way to do it without blocking off the rear garden completely. It would be great if I could wave some deeds at people and say there should really be a right of way through our rear neighbour's garden.

How likely is it that they commandeered the land? Could they have bought it? How do I go about finding out as my searching online was inconclusive. Thanks!

poshfrock Sun 11-Nov-12 12:36:57

If the land s registered then the Land Registry will be able to tell you who owns it. I think the fee is about £4. You will need to send them a plan outlining the area of land in question. If the land is unregistered then you cannot find out who the owner is. It is possible that your neighbours have either purchased the land or claimed possessory title. I would start by calling the Land Registry on Monday.

SunsetSongster Sun 11-Nov-12 12:41:43

Thanks - I didn't realise I could send in a map. I will try that and see what happens.

worsestershiresauce Mon 12-Nov-12 08:58:49

Worth noting that land registry maps do not necessarily show exact boundaries (they have a disclaimer to that effect on them), and if you are wanting to claim a right of way across a neighbour's garden it will be a much bigger more expensive job than simply waving a map at them. You will probably have to enter into a boundary dispute and involve lawyers, and you are unlikely to win if the fences have been where they are for a long time.

Your neighbour's title deeds will be available (for a fee) from the land registry web site, so you can verify where their boundaries lie.

NotQuintAtAllOhNo Mon 12-Nov-12 09:05:20

Who put the fence up?

Is there any chance that your garden has "claimed" a bit of land belonging to the strip? If so, any building work could be put in jeopardy if it turns out you have build on land that does not belong to you?

One of my neighbours have been in a dispute with the council for a few years now, over bit of land like this. She built her extension 5 cm in on land that turned out to be council owned. But I dont know the full details, only that there is a problem. She cant sell her property, but moved to France 5 years ago, letting it long term.

Durab Mon 12-Nov-12 09:19:01

Finding out who owns the land doesn't solve the issue. You (or your neighbour) could own the land, but there could still be a public right of way.

As it's a fairly modern development, it's probably registered land and any right of way will show on the title certificate (certificate of title? - one is registered land the other unregistered and I can never remember which).

Your local council should have records of all rights of way and be able to tell you if there is one. It is possible that there was, but that it was moved to allow for the development. here

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