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wood floor in a kitchen

(15 Posts)
Honestyisbest Wed 03-Oct-12 13:02:56

Have you got a wood floor in your kitchen? We are going for something like a Kahrs engineered wood. Do you have any experience? I like the idea of having the same flooring throughout the downstairs, but am just wondering how the floor will react to getting wet should the dishwasher leak!

squeaver Wed 03-Oct-12 13:08:38

I have a wooden floor in the kitchen. We've never had a dishwasher leak but it gets wet every single day and I just mop it up. Is very practical and does look good as we are open plan through to the living room. I know it was coated/varnished/something (can't remember) when it was laid, that was 12 years ago. The biggest issue I have, I suppose, is that we have floor to ceiling windows in the kitchen and the sun has definitely faded it in some areas.

FishfingersAreOK Wed 03-Oct-12 13:20:22

I am having engineered oak throughout downstairs - except the utility room (where the dog's water bowl will go). I looked into tiles but just couldn't get my head round them for the look I wanted. The oak will fade and get scratched - but to me that is part of it's beauty..
I am going for oiled not lacquered. Lacquered you need an expert to touch it up. Oiled you can do yourself. I used UKFlooringDirect.co.uk

PanicMode Wed 03-Oct-12 13:22:35

We've just put engineered oak throughout our new kitchen/diner/playroom extension - it's oiled and so far looks good. The flooring chap said that we should get a steam cleaner rather than mopping it to avoid putting too much water on it, but I've just been sweeping and lightly mopping and it's fine. As fishfingersareok says, I like the thought of the floor getting a bit battered over time - adds character!

PigletJohn Wed 03-Oct-12 13:40:51

any wood will eventually swell and warp if wet

Apart from water leaks and overflows, this is most often seen round a dogs bowl, and sometimes by a back door exposed to driving rain.

Bamboo flooring boards are available and the makers say will stand up to kitchen and bathroom use, though personally I don't much like the look of it.

betterwhenthesunshines Wed 03-Oct-12 14:44:38

I'm going for engineered oak throughout. House is cold so I don't want tiles as we don't want underfloor heating. The old kitchen foor was wood that had been varnished and seemed to be fine - the new one will be hard wax-oiled. A floor reatiler I spoke to said officially they wouldn't advise wood in a kitchen but lots of people did and they had never had any come back and complain. If you're prepared for some care and maintenance I think it will be fine.

I'm also going for a dark oark look so the more battered it gets the better. plus the dark colour will hide the dirt so I don't have to wash it as frequently

Honestyisbest Wed 03-Oct-12 15:51:05

Thanks all. We currently have wood everywhere but in the kitchen and I must say it has aged pretty well considering the battering it has taken, kids, dogs etc. I use a vax steam cleaner once a week and just run a hoover round the rest of the time. I think we will go for it in the kitchen.
Anyone had underfloor heating underneath? I'd quite like to free up the space needed for a radiator, but having underfloor or vented heating.
Thanks for the link Fishfingers.

DameKewcumber Wed 03-Oct-12 15:54:34

I have engineered oak in kitchen (already here when I bought the house) it hasn't been laid properly in places and has separated a little in one spot. To be honest though no-one notices and it looks fine. I like it better than teh laminate I had in teh last house and its warmer than tiling. Never had a leak so can't comment but it seems to stand up to a moderate amount of water spillage and man we do spill plenty of "moderate" amounts

Arithmeticulous Wed 03-Oct-12 15:58:53

We have engineered wood in the front room and it has not weathered well - same as Kew it was not laid properly and has separated. The solid oak (but cheap as chips at half the price - Wickes 33% off special) in the kitchen has taken more knocks and looks better IME.

TunaPastaBake Wed 03-Oct-12 16:08:56

We have this all downstairs - including kitchen, and utilty room

kardean

Ideal for muddy boys and dogs . - of which I have both grin

squeaver Wed 03-Oct-12 16:12:30

Yes, go for underfloor heating. It's the best.

ISingSoprano Wed 03-Oct-12 16:18:51

We have engineered oak throughout the ground floor including kitchen. It's been down for three years and I am very happy with it, it feels warm underfoot and is much more forgiving than the tiled floor we replaced!

Honestyisbest Thu 04-Oct-12 08:33:20

Thanks all.
So getting it fitted well sounds key!

echt Thu 04-Oct-12 09:37:11

The floor in our kitchen is hardwood, and about 30 years old. Some scratches, but otherwise fine.

PigletJohn Fri 05-Oct-12 00:14:37

now I know you live in Oz, echt

the timber we have here is more expensive and very unlikely to be of the same standard. I have seen some Oz hardwood carving and flooring (envious). Over here a 30 year old house would mostly have chipboard floors (a hundred year old one would have softwood). The modern hardwood flooring is mostly laid on top of the existing structural floor during renovation, and is seldom thick enough or long enough to make a floor on its own. Palaces are an exception.

I was looking at some samples of solid oak flooring today, don't know where it comes from, maybe far east, but is not European oak as the grain is different and it lacks the distinctive medullary rays.

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