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Anyone used a briquette maker to recycle old newspaper?

(9 Posts)
GordonTheGopher Mon 15-Sep-08 19:34:15

Where can I get one, how do they work and is it worth it?

bran Mon 15-Sep-08 19:42:02

They're not worth it IMO. We had one when they were first invented when I was a teenager.

You have to mulch the newspaper with water, then pack it into the briquette maker and press down to remove the excess water. This is a piece of piss for the first few but gets tiring and boring quite quickly. Then leave the briquettes to dry, preferably in the open air but undercover so they don't get rained on. You need quite a bit of space for this as they take longer to dry if they are touching or stacked. This isn't the best time of year to be doing it tbh, you would have better luck making the briquettes in the summer when the weather is good.

Once they're ready they do burn quite well, but they're not as hot as wood. They work better if they are used to bulk out a more expensive fuel, like wood, coal or peat.

I can virtually guarantee that whoever is doing the making will lose interest before they have made enough to cover the cost of the gadget (at least my db and I did).

bran Mon 15-Sep-08 19:42:07

They're not worth it IMO. We had one when they were first invented when I was a teenager.

You have to mulch the newspaper with water, then pack it into the briquette maker and press down to remove the excess water. This is a piece of piss for the first few but gets tiring and boring quite quickly. Then leave the briquettes to dry, preferably in the open air but undercover so they don't get rained on. You need quite a bit of space for this as they take longer to dry if they are touching or stacked. This isn't the best time of year to be doing it tbh, you would have better luck making the briquettes in the summer when the weather is good.

bran Mon 15-Sep-08 19:42:17

They're not worth it IMO. We had one when they were first invented when I was a teenager.

You have to mulch the newspaper with water, then pack it into the briquette maker and press down to remove the excess water. This is a piece of piss for the first few but gets tiring and boring quite quickly. Then leave the briquettes to dry, preferably in the open air but undercover so they don't get rained on. You need quite a bit of space for this as they take longer to dry if they are touching or stacked. This isn't the best time of year to be doing it tbh, you would have better luck making the briquettes in the summer when the weather is good.

bran Mon 15-Sep-08 19:42:42

Oops, sorry. blush

BreeVanderCampLGJ Mon 15-Sep-08 19:44:27

Bran

Do you remember it being launched on the Late Late ??

grin

GordonTheGopher Mon 15-Sep-08 19:45:39

Oh bran I thought I had lots of replies to my boring post! Will think again thanks.

expatinscotland Mon 15-Sep-08 19:52:59

is it something you can leave to the kids to keep them busy of an afternoon?

wink

bran Mon 15-Sep-08 19:54:02

If you can find a cheapo one on ebay or something then it would probably be worth a try Gordon, but really unless you have a hoard of children who need to burn off some energy and like to get messy I don't think it would get used very much.

I do remember that Bree, I think they must have sold loads when it first came out, the Irish love to be scrooges thrifty. grin

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