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Exceeding??

(34 Posts)
candlefloozy Wed 13-Mar-19 18:32:34

Just got back from child's parents evening and they said that they will be pushing child to exceeding in reading and writing. What does this mean??

OP’s posts: |
Pandasarecute Wed 13-Mar-19 18:34:00

It means doing better than expected for their age group. There are, “expected” levels, they hope your child will do better than these

candlefloozy Wed 13-Mar-19 18:38:22

@Pandasarecute thank you. The way the teacher described it was a bit confusing.

OP’s posts: |
ritzbiscuits Sun 17-Mar-19 11:12:21

Have a look at this link, it explains Expected and Exceeding standard for each EYFS measure.

https://m.oxfordshire.gov.uk/cms/sites/default/files/folders/documents/childreneducationandfamilies/informationforchildcareproviders/Toolkit/Explorationoff_Expectedandd_ExceedingEYFSPP_%20descriptors.pdf

TeeJay1970 Sun 17-Mar-19 17:15:02

It means your child is very bright - be proud.

Although I suspect you already knew. Funny how all the Mumsneters who don't understand the grades have bright kids.

candlefloozy Sun 17-Mar-19 19:01:56

@TeeJay1970 thank you. She seems bright to me but I just thought everyone thought that of their child.

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gower4 Sun 17-Mar-19 19:03:49

I don't think it necessarily does mean they are very bright. It just means they are ahead of where they would be expected to be at this age. They could just be a fast developer who then plateaus or even drops behind.

candlefloozy Sun 17-Mar-19 19:04:05

@ritzbiscuits thank you for that. It explains it. She's been doing a lot of that since she started school

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ritzbiscuits Sun 17-Mar-19 19:36:26

I wouldn't get too hung up on the levels at this stage. For exceeding in writing they need to be spelling correctly and using punctuation, capital letter to start a sentence etc. I have no concerns if my DS isn't quite there by the end of the year!

LemonFritz Mon 18-Mar-19 05:57:37

@ritzbiscuits My DS got exceeding for every element of the EYFS and I’m still not sure he did all of those things. He’s now in year 1 and I can’t always read his writing (his hand can barely keep up with his thoughts).

He’s perfect to me but I’m sure he’s nothing too special. Just a bog standard bright, September born. Perhaps it varies by school.

LemonFritz Mon 18-Mar-19 06:00:16

Teacher also told me DD4 is set to be exceeding in everything this year, so I don’t think it’s uncommon.

Lovely to hear, but nothing to get too excited about.

Hollowvictory Mon 18-Mar-19 08:15:22

Exceeding just means achieving more than the minimum expected standard, the bar is quite low hence its very common to be exceeding in all areas. As they go up the sch4it becomes more difficult in subjects that require talent rather than just effort eg art

GreenerDarker Mon 18-Mar-19 08:22:10

Exceeding just means achieving more than the minimum expected standard, the bar is quite low hence its very common to be exceeding in all areas.

That’s not true. Exceeding achieving higher than the top of the expected range. And expected is a pretty wide bracket in some eyfs subject areas. It should be fairly unusual for a child to achieve exceeding in all areas.

candlefloozy Mon 18-Mar-19 16:05:46

Thanks for the further replies. I just didn't know what it meant. Obviously it seems like it's good. Which is great. It's not the sort of thing you can ask any other parents in her class either.

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SoyDora Wed 20-Mar-19 21:35:23

How could you not know that ‘exceeding’ is a good thing, if you know what the word ‘exceeding’ means?

candlefloozy Thu 21-Mar-19 19:26:14

@SoyDora I meant that does it mean really high or just higher than average

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Hollowvictory Thu 21-Mar-19 19:35:41

It's a wide range so could be either but it's expected rather than average. Could be a genius or could be just slightly above the expected minimum level. It's a wide range!

Hollowvictory Thu 21-Mar-19 19:36:09

You'd expect about a quarter of the class to be exceeding.

GreenerDarker Fri 22-Mar-19 06:01:11

Again, what hollowvictory is saying is not true.
Exceeding in writing is way above the expected minimum. It’s basically writing your own stories using correct spellings. The Expected minimum is writing a short sentence (no punctuation) using phonetically plausible spellings and the odd high frequency word.
Expected is a very wide bracket and pretty much covers everything in between the two above.
I have no idea where she’s getting that 25% figure from. Again not true.

grumpyyetgorgeous Fri 22-Mar-19 06:19:09

Exceeding just means achieving more than the minimum expected standard, the bar is quite low hence its very common to be exceeding in all areas. As they go up the sch4it becomes more difficult in subjects that require talent rather than just effort eg art

@Hollowvictory
You are talking rubbish, if a child gets to age related they are doing well because the current national curriculum expectations are fairly challenging. The official figures showed (I think) around 10% of children reaching exceeding not 25%.

candlefloozy Fri 22-Mar-19 06:36:50

Thanks for the replies. So basically she's doing well in reading and writing?

OP’s posts: |
GreenerDarker Fri 22-Mar-19 06:42:07

Yes.

Hollowvictory Fri 22-Mar-19 07:11:20

@GreenerDarker you don't know the age if the child so how can you say what the expected or exceeding targets are? You've assumed recept but the op never said that.
Op they said they're pushing your child to exceeding which means they aren't currently exceeding but have the potential to do so.

GreenerDarker Fri 22-Mar-19 07:23:08

I assume reception because the OP thanked a PP for linking to a document that explains the ELGs at the end of Reception.

LemonFritz Fri 22-Mar-19 07:30:44

The teacher told me that around 2% of children are exceeding in all areas at the end of EYFS. I have been googling due to this thread and found a report:

assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/748814/EYFSP_2018_Main_Text.pdf

Apparently, it was 2.6% last year. Very interesting seeing the breakdowns by gender, etc.

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