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Cursive writing KS1

(8 Posts)
Hotcrosscakes Thu 22-Feb-18 13:45:14

Mr Google seems to tell me that ‘working at the expected standard’ for end of KS1 does not require cursive writing, but ‘working at greater depth’ does.

Can anyone confirm if I have understood correctly?

Also - is there an expectation of ‘tidiness’ in presentation in any of the categories? I can’t see mention of it on line but am pretty sure a teacher mentioned it but I’m not sure against which category.

Thanks.

OP’s posts: |
Fairenuff Thu 22-Feb-18 18:23:37

Yes, handwriting has to be joined to achieve greater depth.

Tomorrowillbeachicken Thu 22-Feb-18 19:16:35

Insane, anyone know what happens to children using a scribe or iPad for their sats due to Sen?

Norestformrz Thu 22-Feb-18 19:22:27

They can achieve expected

Tomorrowillbeachicken Thu 22-Feb-18 19:25:48

Well, that sucks. But in the long run not too worried.

Hotcrosscakes Fri 23-Feb-18 10:35:06

Great thanks. That does seem odd from a SEN point of view.

What about tidiness - for example the writing is joined and legible but some issues (e.g a ‘ve’ results in the ‘e’ being above the line) and is generally untidy / scrappy looking. Would that automatically mean GD not achievable? Similarly - can you achieve ES with messy but legible joined up writing?

Thanks.

OP’s posts: |
LetItGoToRuin Fri 23-Feb-18 11:47:48

I found this (download the 2017/18 document): www.gov.uk/government/publications/teacher-assessment-frameworks-at-the-end-of-key-stage-1

English writing
Using the English writing framework
• The three standards in this framework contain a number of ‘pupil can’ statements. To judge that a pupil is working at a standard in English writing, teachers need to have evidence which demonstrates that the pupil meets the standard described overall.
• A pupil’s writing should meet all the statements within the standard at which they are judged. However, teachers can use their discretion to ensure that, on occasion, a particular weakness does not prevent an accurate judgement being made of a pupil’s attainment overall. A teacher’s professional judgement about whether the pupil has met the standard overall takes precedence. This approach applies to English writing only.
• A particular weakness could relate to a part or the whole of a statement (or statements), if there is good reason to judge that it would prevent an accurate judgement being made.
• A pupil’s answers to specific questions in classroom tests may provide additional evidence that they have met certain statements, including the optional end-of-key stage 1 English grammar, punctuation and spelling test. Although tests might not focus solely on the key aspects in this framework, they may also provide evidence to support the judgement overall.
• A pupil’s writing which teachers use to make judgements must be produced independently. Teachers can refer to STA’s guidance on teacher assessment for further information about independent work.

Working towards the expected standard
The pupil can, after discussion with the teacher:
• write sentences that are sequenced to form a short narrative (real or fictional)
• demarcate some sentences with capital letters and full stops
• segment spoken words into phonemes and represent these by graphemes, spelling some words correctly and making phonically-plausible attempts at others
• spell some common exception words*
• form lower-case letters in the correct direction, starting and finishing in the right place
• form lower-case letters of the correct size relative to one another in some of their writing
• use spacing between words.

* These are detailed in the word lists within the spelling appendix to the national curriculum (English Appendix 1). Teachers should refer to these to exemplify the words that pupils should be able to spell.

Working at the expected standard
The pupil can, after discussion with the teacher:
• write simple, coherent narratives about personal experiences and those of others (real or fictional)
• write about real events, recording these simply and clearly
• demarcate most sentences in their writing with capital letters and full stops, and use question marks correctly when required
• use present and past tense mostly correctly and consistently
• use co-ordination (e.g. or / and / but) and some subordination (e.g. when / if / that / because) to join clauses
• segment spoken words into phonemes and represent these by graphemes, spelling many of these words correctly and making phonically-plausible attempts at others
• spell many common exception words*
• form capital letters and digits of the correct size, orientation and relationship to one another and to lower-case letters
• use spacing between words that reflects the size of the letters.

Working at greater depth
The pupil can, after discussion with the teacher:
• write effectively and coherently for different purposes, drawing on their reading to inform the vocabulary and grammar of their writing
• make simple additions, revisions and proof-reading corrections to their own writing
• use the punctuation taught at key stage 1 mostly correctly^
• spell most common exception words*
• add suffixes to spell most words correctly in their writing (e.g. –ment, –ness, –ful, –less, –ly)*
• use the diagonal and horizontal strokes needed to join some letters.

* These are detailed in the word lists within the spelling appendix to the national curriculum (English Appendix 1). Teachers should refer to these to exemplify the words that pupils should be able to spell.
^ This relates to punctuation taught in the national curriculum, which is detailed within the grammar and punctuation appendix to the national curriculum (English Appendix 2).

LetItGoToRuin Fri 23-Feb-18 11:56:05

Picking out some relevant bits:

From the judging from the ‘working at greater depth’ statement:

”use the diagonal and horizontal strokes needed to join some letters.”

From the introductory blurb:

“A pupil’s writing should meet all the statements within the standard at which they are judged. However, teachers can use their discretion to ensure that, on occasion, a particular weakness does not prevent an accurate judgement being made of a pupil’s attainment overall. A teacher’s professional judgement about whether the pupil has met the standard overall takes precedence. This approach applies to English writing only.

A particular weakness could relate to a part or the whole of a statement (or statements), if there is good reason to judge that it would prevent an accurate judgement being made.”

This reads to me as though it is possible to get GD without joining, if overall attainment other than that particular weakness is clearly at GD level.

I’m not a teacher. I may have misunderstood.

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