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SATs in 11+ area - quick query

(10 Posts)
Orlandsundry Sun 21-Jan-18 10:34:17

I have a Y5 daughter who is already stressing about her Y6 SATs and I wondered whether the pressure to do well in SATs is so high in 11+ areas?

RedSkyAtNight Sun 21-Jan-18 12:55:28

I would imagine so - the school doesn't care about the 11+ but does care about SATS!

Twofishfingers Mon 22-Jan-18 16:26:35

It depends on the school. Our school still hasn't started practice for SATS, they talk about it once in a while but there is no stress on children (and they do get excellent results year on year - in 2017 they were in the top 5% in the country).

I think that children who are prepped for 11+ and for entrance exams put pressure (not on purpose) on all the other children in the class by talking about all the extra tuition they have at home, complaining about the extra work, etc. There is competition between parents and children on all sorts of entrance exams.

BubblesBuddy Mon 22-Jan-18 20:27:00

It has changed around here. (11 plus area). Parents could not care less about SATs when mine were younger and the schools were fairly laid back too. Schools are now far more switched into SATs. Parents still worry about 11 plus a lot more if they have paid out mega bucks on tuition and expect a return on their investment. SATs is a doddle for these children because they come months after the 11 plus results are known and the children are fairly relaxed about it.

Julraj Mon 12-Feb-18 13:56:52

They're fundamentally different tests - SATs test how much your child has 'soaked up' from their education and they're largely assessing whether they can then put this to paper. The 11+ tests meanwhile test for potential and are essentially IQ tests for kids.

Not to beat around the bush but 11+ tests aim to separate high achieving kids from the rest so they can syphon off the high achieving ones and celebrate their high GCSEs/A-Levels!

Of course if there's a collection of high achieving grammar schools in an area (and a lot of people move into the area to get into said schools) then it's likely the SATs results would also be pretty high there.

PurpleSky9 Mon 12-Feb-18 21:59:21

I’m about to post a thread on this - I have a very stressed out YR 6 boy coming up to his SATS. He’s getting himself into a real state over them. If any one can recommend any good support resources, particularly for English, I’d be really grateful - he already has a tutor.

I’ve spoken to the school and frankly their response has been a little frustrating. They get great results year on year, but the pressure on the children seems ridiculous. I’m also concerned that the whole curriculum seems geared to getting round the SATs test. They’ve barely had a science or history lesson all term. Is anyone else finding this?

PerspicaciaTick Mon 12-Feb-18 22:05:12

Zero pressure around the 11+ here. The HT doesn't believe in selective education so the 11+ is never mentioned. SATS pressure was massive with children being lied to by teachers saying their secondary school places would be withdrawn if they didn't do well. DD coped beautifully with the 11+ but suffered stress-related hair loss over SATS (even though she knew they weren't important to us as a family).

CatMuffin Mon 12-Feb-18 22:12:37

Purple. Could you dig deeper about what he is worrying will happen if he doesn't do well? Does he have good reason to think he won't do well?

PurpleSky9 Mon 12-Feb-18 22:33:34

It seems to be same as PerspicaciaTick. He’s worried he won’t be able to go to the same school as his friends and that the SATs result will determine the sets he’s in for the next few years. We’ve told him it doesn’t matter, the results mean nothing to us and that his place in school is safe, but it doesn’t seem to be sinking in. He’s having trouble sleeping and as a result, he is now struggling in school, even in the subjects he used to fly in.

PerspicaciaTick Tue 13-Feb-18 11:43:23

Oh Purple, your poor lad sad
FWIW, DD settled beautifully in secondary school and is now a confident Y9. With hindsight Y6 was a real low point for her and I'm still ashamed that I was so behind the curve as to what support she needed. You, on the other hand, are aware of the problem and I'm sure you will help your DS emerge safely into Y7'

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