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Reception - term time holiday

(21 Posts)
passthecremeeggs Sun 09-Apr-17 22:19:13

Apologies if this has been done to death.

Child is 5 in May, so not compulsory school age until September and so, as I understand it, I can't be fined for it until then. Understand that other non attendance measures can be taken and that absence won't be authorised. Holiday would be partly in summer half term, partly not (Wednesday-Wednesday) so missing only 3 days of school.

I'm not going to pretend it's an educational trip. It's a sunny summer holiday that costs 50% less at that time than it does in July/August and we havent had a holiday (UK or abroad) for five years because of family circs.

Would you? And if you have, at this age, were there any repercussions?

soapboxqueen Sun 09-Apr-17 22:23:39

Yes I would. I'm taking mine out in June and he's in year 3.

They can mark it down as unauthorised but they can't fine you. If you were away for more than 2 weeks they could remove you from roll.

IvyLeagueUnderTheSea Sun 09-Apr-17 22:28:34

I teach reception.
My personal opinion is go for it. They are not compulsory so you won't get fined.

irvineoneohone Mon 10-Apr-17 00:11:57

My ds' school is very relaxed about term time holidays. I would go.
Sunny summer holiday for a young children is educational enough, imo.

passthecremeeggs Mon 10-Apr-17 09:35:01

Thank you for your replies which have definitely made me feel a bit better - particularly hearing from a reception teacher. Just need to get over my fear of breaking the rules - I don't want to get told off! blush

IvyLeagueUnderTheSea Mon 10-Apr-17 11:34:15

There is no telling off to be done!
It happens all the time in my class, especially with children who are non compulsory right to the end of the year. Parents come and ask and I always say that they should do it while they can still take advantage of the lower prices.
I generally suggest that they do it properly by getting a request form from the office. That way it's all official. Still, there is nothing that you can be told off for.

Frazzled2207 Mon 10-Apr-17 11:36:52

My august born is starting school this sep- I intend to do as you intend if if saves a lot of money, especially as he won't be compulsory school age for a year.

2014newme Mon 10-Apr-17 11:47:29

Yes I take mine out unauthorised every year for 5 days. No fines or repercussions.
I just write to school informing them.
This is my 5th year of doing it.

2014newme Mon 10-Apr-17 11:48:24

There's no telling off! 😂

Starlighter Mon 10-Apr-17 11:53:07

My DD's (also 5 in May!) school is so strict about holidays but we're going away in June! Missing 7 days of school, eeek! It's a big family holiday and we're the only ones with a school age child. Nobody could afford to go in summer holidays - it was literally twice the price!

I sent the letter 2 weeks ago, no response yet! Scared!

Starlighter Mon 10-Apr-17 11:56:00

My friend's school sent her a really arsey response to her holiday request and cc'd in a bunch of education people! Her DD is compulsory school age tho but otherwise great attendance and so bright.

2014newme Mon 10-Apr-17 12:06:16

Any arsey letter is a stand print off not personal. Attendance and brightness are irrelevant in how they deal with it.

I wouldn't take more than 5 days per year personally but others do and are not fined.

passthecremeeggs Mon 10-Apr-17 12:28:54

Well I'm feeling much better about this now. Eldest child so didn't really know what to expect. I'll write in at the start of term.

2014newme Mon 10-Apr-17 12:29:54

You'll find they are not bothered in the slightest.

passthecremeeggs Mon 10-Apr-17 12:30:52

Oh just one more thing - do I make a request or just tell them I'm taking her out? I suppose it doesn't make much difference either way as it won't be authorised but guess it's more polite to ask!

2014newme Mon 10-Apr-17 12:56:27

I dont request authorised absence as I don't have exceptional circumstances. I just write a nice letter saying dd will be absent from x date to date and that I understand this is unauthorised.

2014newme Mon 10-Apr-17 12:56:50

Perhaps it's different if she isn't five yet?

IvyLeagueUnderTheSea Mon 10-Apr-17 18:30:21

2014, a child does not have to attend school until the term after their 5th birthday. Therefore if the child turns 5 in May they don't have to go to school until this coming September.
No one will be fined or 'told off' as there is no law or rule being broken.

In the past parents have just told me it's happening. I have suggested they fill out the form mainly so the office know and they won't get bugged with phone calls.

MiaowTheCat Wed 12-Apr-17 20:20:47

Fair few of the parents in DD1's class have done it this year - generally they've had a shitty letter from the head muttering that it's wrong, their pet graphic of days lost mattering, and a darkly reluctant line that "because they're not yet compulsory school age we won't fine you this time" She tries to bullshit that the lack of fine is because of her personal generosity and not the lack of legal ball grabbing to it!

My opinions on the head are fairly well vented on here though.

BollardDodger Sun 16-Apr-17 19:39:10

You cannot be fined for it, nor can it be included on their educational records. The attendance records begin at the point of compulsory schooling.

bangingmyheadoffabrickwall Tue 18-Apr-17 14:48:36

Me and DH are going on a half term holiday in May.

The destination we want flies out on Bank Holiday Monday and due to the return flight, means we don't get back until 6th June which is a Tuesday.

I have no issues with children taking term time planned absences when their attendance is excellent and they are achieving their expectations. The problems which has caused this term time holiday rule fiasco is the families who allow their child regular one day absences (the ones who have at least one day off a week or fortnight and claim sickness and usually a Friday or a Monday).

Did I mention that I am a part-time teacher and will continue to take my children on family breaks as I see fit. I will also support families who also want term time family breaks as long as they are actively supportive in their child's education and their child has, otherwise, excellent attendance and attainment at school.

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