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KEY stage 1 maths. Does your dc use a number line / counters for addition?

(13 Posts)
Frusso Sun 30-Oct-16 11:18:23

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

AuntieStella Sun 30-Oct-16 11:19:27

IIRC, mine used number lines

MissClarke86 Sun 30-Oct-16 11:22:08

Year 1 is practical moving into counting on mentally.

Year 2 is counting on mentally (up to 100) and using other written methods - we teach them the tens and ones practically using equipment, then they draw the tens and ones to add them, then they move on to column addition.

Some can do it mentally because they see the pattern quickly this way.

They also learn to do things like add multiples of 10 mentally and quickly by looking for patterns.

I'm a year 2 teacher. Google the 2016 KS1maths arithmetic test to see the expectation (they are allowed no equipment but may record with pencil).

The best thing you can do to move them on is do LOTS of counting forwards and backwards, starting on different numbers.

Feenie Sun 30-Oct-16 12:54:37

However, Y2 teachers are required to give a final teacher assessment, of which the test is a very small part. Teachers must use the Interim Framework for Assesment which does not match the test, which is incredibly annoying - it states that using apparatus is fine and matches age related expectations.

www.gov.uk/government/publications/2017-interim-frameworks-for-teacher-assessment-at-the-end-of-key-stage-1

MissClarke86 Sun 30-Oct-16 12:58:15

Feenie, very true. We were not moderated last year so but I'd still be very reluctant to put a child at "age related" if they were nowhere near on the SATs arithmetic. Frustrating and clearly mismatched.

Assessment aside though, I do still think the majority of year 2 children are capable of using drawings and formal written methods to add 2 digit numbers, provided they have good place value knowledge first. The only children I've found that still struggle with this are children who aren't really secure with the number system and counting forwards/backwards. Lots of making numbers from tens and ones and they're ready for the next step.

mrz Sun 30-Oct-16 13:12:33

Normally would start using concrete objects (some type of counter) then move onto number lines and 100 squares.

MissClarke86 Sun 30-Oct-16 13:20:23

I have a mixed relationship with 100 squares and number lines. They're good for seeing that adding jumps forwards.

What children generally do though, is count the jumps forward, copy the answer and not give a second thought to the numbers/counting process. Therefore it doesn't actually help with the transition to counting on mentally.

If you're going to use them, you need to be encouraging children to actually say the numbers as they're jumping on to develop their counting on skills.

Feenie Sun 30-Oct-16 13:23:06

Depends on the school's calculation policy - I wouldn't teach formal written methods in Y2, and they are not a requirement.

mrz Sun 30-Oct-16 13:26:42

For the examples the OP gives I would expect mental methods

Frusso Sun 30-Oct-16 13:37:54

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Feenie Sun 30-Oct-16 13:50:21

Maybe try looking at the school website - they may have their calculation policy on there which would hopefully show you the steps they are teaching. Failing that, speak to the teacher.

Frusso Sun 30-Oct-16 14:51:21

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Bluebird23 Sun 30-Oct-16 18:38:38

My DS (Y2) uses mental methods for simple addition and is using column addition for larger numbers. The School follows the Singapore Maths concept, not sure if this makes any difference.

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