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Deciding between two schools - could an educational psychologist advise?

(9 Posts)
FlorenceCraye Fri 01-Jul-16 17:42:06

We are trying to decide between two fairly different schools for my child, starting reception Sep 2016 (more boundaries, results focused vs more playful, developing personality and thinking). While I understand my child's personality well, I find it difficult to assess what type of school would fit that personality better. Would an educational psychologist be able to help? Has anyone used one for this purpose? Would you have one to recommend?

If not an educational psychologist, what profession would be able to help? I have reached out to several school consultants, but, while very knowledgeable on the schools, they could not offer an opinion on fit.

All thoughts and suggestions greatly appreciated.

PotteringAlong Fri 01-Jul-16 17:44:57

You don't need an educational psychologist! Go and visit them, decide which one you like best, apply there.

I'm assuming sept 2016 is a typo and you mean 2017

dogdrifts Fri 01-Jul-16 17:49:28

This is where you get to step up as a parent, I'm afraid. No one that you can pay for a service knows your child as well as you do, and sometimes you just have to make a choice.
Out of interest, have you and your child visited both schools? If all else is equal, go with the one nearest to your house. Really.

LIZS Fri 01-Jul-16 17:58:40

Ed Psychs would rarely recommend one school over another unless there is clear cut SEN and specific provision provided at one. You need to visit and talk to head/teachers, take into account logistics and likelihood of success if you apply.

SenoritaViva Fri 01-Jul-16 18:05:45

This decision should really be yours, visit with your child and see which he prefers. If you really can't decide go with whichever head teacher you like the most as they lead the school.

Zodlebud Fri 01-Jul-16 20:51:26

I agree that this is only a question you can answer. Look at your family values and the approach you take to bringing up your children. Choose the school that fits best with that.

I would say that a couple of years ago I was so wrapped up in getting my kids into the "best" schools and academic results that I actually forgot what was important to me. In the end I realised that I wanted my children to be happy, to be around like minded people, to understand that I always expect them to do their best but this doesn't mean being top of the class, to be kind and treat others with respect and to look at every opportunity that comes their way and embrace it.

As a result children are at a good but sometimes overlooked school as there are other schools in the area with better results BUT they love school, the ethos fits with what we're all about, and they are in top sets in all subjects. Happy kids = children who do well.

Follow your gut reaction - it IS the right one.

shouldwestayorshouldwego Fri 01-Jul-16 22:12:29

Agree you need to visit and follow your intuition. Remember too that if state then you are just expressing a preference so the choice may be taken from you. It seems an enormous decision but remember it is only for 7yrs and even then if you aren't happy you can always move. I have unexpectedly moved two of my dc. I don't regret my initial school choice - it was right at the time, but situations change and we moved.

MissoniMad Sat 02-Jul-16 23:40:20

If these are private schools or good state ones, especially in a 'pushy parent' area, employ a schools consultant such as Gabbitas, or preferably a cheaper one! Their primary purpose is to advise on schools.

smellyboot Sun 03-Jul-16 22:01:23

Blimey just go and see and decide which one you prefer. Even if you choose a perfect school for you, you may not like a particular teacher or your child might not. You are massively over thinking it. We chose a huge creative multicultural school over a strict small traditional white mc faith one. We would have qualified for both. Choose what suits what you want in terms of overall education.

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