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At parents' evening is it okay to ask for a translation into old levels

(18 Posts)
kippersyllabub Mon 07-Mar-16 20:43:48

I am fairly sure I will be told that ds is working towards in English and working above in maths. That information really isn't useful to me: I would like to know if he's progressing in each category. Likelihood is he will go through primary in the same situation but I want to know if he's making progress and at what rate.

Wibu to ask for a best guess at old levels or do teachers not think about those any more?

spanieleyes Mon 07-Mar-16 20:48:50

The difficulty is that the old levels don't relate to the expectations of the new curriculum. For example, I could say a child is working at a 4b in writing-which last year would have been perfectly fine for year 6 and at the expected level. This year it would be working towards ( probably!)

WombatStewForTea Mon 07-Mar-16 21:40:58

Yes you would be unreasonable as they don't correlate!

MrsKCastle Mon 07-Mar-16 21:50:27

"I want to know if he's making progress and at what rate."

Just ask this. I wouldn't be able to give parents a very level for their child, especially because as previous posters say, the expectations are different. But I can certainly tell each parent if their child is progressing at the expected rate, faster or slower.

ChalkHearts Mon 07-Mar-16 21:52:14

Whatever you ask I guarantee you'll be told he's progressing at the expected rate.

lborolass Mon 07-Mar-16 21:59:48

I don't think it's fair on the teacher, they will no doubt be trying to get to grips with the new system and having to assess pupils under two different methods is asking too much imo

Fedup21 Mon 07-Mar-16 22:05:39

It would be impossible for the teacher to do that and pretty useless. I could say your child's writing would have got them a 2b which would be expected for the end of y2, but that same piece of writing under the new curriculum would be deemed below age related expectation.

Would that make you feel happy that last year she was good enough but now she's not?!

MrsKCastle Mon 07-Mar-16 23:12:29

"Whatever you ask I guarantee you'll be told he's progressing at the expected rate."

Really? If I teach a child who isn't making progress, I'd want to make very sure that their parents know. And if they're making exceptionally good progress, I'd also want to make that clear. I'd rather be upfront and honest than have unpleasant confrontations over the end of year report.

angelcake20 Mon 07-Mar-16 23:30:53

DD's teacher gave me an equivalent for maths and science (they were even written in her report) but not for English, which I think is just too different. She said that she's been thinking in levels for so long, it is ingrained. No mention of working towards, at or beyond etc. though I know where her spelling means she's likely to end up for English.

bojorojo Tue 08-Mar-16 01:10:35

I really cannot understand why schools have not put on information evenngs for parents. Lots of schools have and it so much easier for everyone to understand when there has been an expanation before parents' evening!

Unfortunately not all children progress at the expected rate and this is why parents' consultation could be useful to explain where extra practice is needed. Unfortunately all parents want to know is the old levels. If parents were given an outline of the curriculum and a talk on how the school is assessing children, they might have more idea of how it was all working in their school.

At our school, two assessments have already been done, out of a total of 4 for the year. The data has been analysed and the teachers do know who is making rapid progress and who is not. They also know strengths and weakensses that need working on. As Governors we have received information on each year group, and on each subject for those children, regarding progress being made. Fantastic for many last term, slowed up a bit this term.

WombatStewForTea Tue 08-Mar-16 06:43:59

I really cannot understand why schools have not put on information evenngs for parents

We did. A very small percentage turned up. No doubt the ones who didn't will be the ones complaining at parent's evening.

Sirzy Tue 08-Mar-16 06:46:22

I was about to say the same as wombat. I went to the information evening at school and was one of about 10 parents (in a school of 200) who did!

SuffolkNWhat Tue 08-Mar-16 06:51:37

"Whatever you ask I guarantee you'll be told he's progressing at the expected rate."

Really? If I teach a child who isn't making progress, I'd want to make very sure that their parents know. And if they're making exceptionally good progress, I'd also want to make that clear. I'd rather be upfront and honest than have unpleasant confrontations over the end of year report.

I agree in part but surely if that was the case you'd have contacted home before now? I would never use parents evening as the first time to mention lack of progress.

Arkwright Tue 08-Mar-16 06:52:42

Our school did an information evening. 12 parents attended out of 420 children. Me, Dh and my brother went meaning only 9 others were interested.

MrsKCastle Tue 08-Mar-16 07:32:20

Suffolk NWhat Oh absolutely, where I have concerns the parents are well aware and I speak to them fairly regularly. Parents evening shouldn't bring any real surprises IMO. I was just responding to the implication from ChalkHearts that teachers might not give an honest and informative response.

WhattodoSue Tue 08-Mar-16 08:43:39

My children's school had a KS1 SAT info session for parents at 4-4.45pm. So any parent who works couldn't go, and any parent with children not in clubs couldn't go, and any parent with children in clubs (finish at 4.30) could make only part of it. Lack of attendance isn't always lack of interest!!!!

Bryt Tue 08-Mar-16 08:57:27

My DD's school held their information session in the afternoon, excluding working parents and parents who didn't have a spouse home to care for the children. The school did not send written guidance home back then (September) we're just now getting some info. with reports that have come home. Our school is using different wording for their criteria and there's no 'working below', it's more like 'beginning to acquire...' Parents Evening tonight and I'm hoping DH can get some clarity.

AuntieUrsula Tue 08-Mar-16 10:58:40

I asked this at parents evening, and one teacher gave me a rough equivalent level but the other said it wasn't possible to graft levels onto the new curriculum. I did find it helpful to have even a rough idea though, as I also fine 'working at expected level' not all that useful.

And agree with Chalk, in my experience teachers like to tell you your child is doing fine/progressing as expected even though in practice that covers a broad spectrum of attainment!

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