Advertisement

loader

Talk

Advanced search

teacher off sick AGAIN

(110 Posts)
HeisInfuriating Thu 08-Oct-15 17:28:45

Advice please
DD new teacher this year is off sick all week.
This follows a three year pattern of her returning every Sept and then going off sick by half term. Doesn't return at all until following Sept.

Teacher has been moved year group from 6 to 4 this year so I wasn't expecting to suffer this.

In previous years a permanent supply is eventually sought.

What sickness benefits do teachers have? How can this be still happening?

I'm thinking more along the lines of when will the head act and source something permanent?

GlaceCherries Thu 08-Oct-15 17:39:35

We had a job share / part time teacher at our primary school who did this. Our head couldn't get rid of the teacher. The teacher left at the end of the academic year, went to a neighbouring school and pulled the same thing again. I would have felt sorry for her if she had been genuinely poorly, but based on her behaviour and attitude it seemed more likely that she just liked being on sick leave.

It was so disruptive and unfair on the children.

mrz Thu 08-Oct-15 18:07:37

Sick benefit depends on how long she has been employed

spanieleyes Thu 08-Oct-15 18:18:16

My friend went off sick at October half term and didn't return until the following September, when she taught until November before going off sick again . The difference is that she didn't return the following September as she was dead. She hadn't intended to go off sick again in the November, but then she hadn't expected the cancer to return.

HeisInfuriating Thu 08-Oct-15 18:24:12

Spaniel I'm sorry to hear that.
It isn't the case here, but I don't want to divulge too much about this teachers situation.

She is a long term employee of the school, I am guessing ten to fifteen years.
Mrz how does that impact?

Thank you

00100001 Thu 08-Oct-15 18:26:13

How do you know what the teacher is off I'll with???

HeisInfuriating Thu 08-Oct-15 18:29:10

Glacé I know what you mean.
There were no plans at the start of the year, think peg labels or homework folders prepped.

There has been no homework this term, no reading books sent home and this usually reasonably well behaved class has been chaos and naughty since term started. DC lost first golden time in 4 years
(secretly proud, gotta be done). But a well behaved child is joining in the chaos.

There is endless quiet reading in class, DC on 8th book now.

I guess what I mean is, the term didn't even start well planned and organised. So perhaps she had no intention of being around.

HeisInfuriating Thu 08-Oct-15 18:30:12

It's not been secret at school for last three years.

AmarettoSour Thu 08-Oct-15 18:30:15

How do you know what the teacher is off I'll with???

I always find posts like this odd. As if no one can ever know personal details of someone else's life just because they're a teacher, and if they do then they must have got the details wrong.

OP could know the teacher personally for all we know confused

WhoTheFuckIsSimon Thu 08-Oct-15 18:31:16

If it's like other public sector jobs then coming back will reset sick pay.

In the nhs I get six months full pay, six months half pay. Which is maximum allowed and you only get that after working for the nhs for six years.

But I believe if I came back for a bit after a year off sick I would then get another six months full pay, six months half pay if I went off again.

WhoTheFuckIsSimon Thu 08-Oct-15 18:32:52

As for when the head will act I guess it varies from head to head.

But if someone has a sick note it's very hard to do anything.

NewLife4Me Thu 08-Oct-15 18:33:58

Don't you have to have sick notes off your doctor, wouldn't somebody have done something by now if she wasn't ill?

Keeptrudging Thu 08-Oct-15 18:36:06

Damn, why did I not know this before I handed in my resignation?envy

00100001 Thu 08-Oct-15 18:36:10

amaretto yes she could know her personally. But as she doesn't say that, I can't assume, can I?

And if the person doesn't know the teacher, then I don't see how she'd know what the reasons for absence are confused

The reason for absence is important

ijustwannadance Thu 08-Oct-15 18:41:18

Is it stress or depression? The school my sis taught at had teacher who was given a job teaching 7-8 year old. Off sick with stress as couldn't cope by xmas. The next sept was given year 1. Same again. Off sick then gave notice. She then got a job teaching reception at another school and didn't even make it til oct half term!

Twowrongsdontmakearight Thu 08-Oct-15 18:45:41

DS's Y3 teacher went off sick from December till the end of the year. This happened again when she had DD (by then in Y4). It happened pretty much every year. Now DS is in year 11 and friends with DC still in that school say she's still at it! So at least 7 years! When she's there she is a very good teacher but we worked out she was there less than 50% of the time most years. And it's very disruptive for the DC.

HeisInfuriating Thu 08-Oct-15 18:48:24

It's not been mental anxiety type illness in the previous three years.

How many 'weeks' would needed to be worked before sick pay kicks in again?

I expect she is on a high pay grade meaning six months half in addition to six full would still be a tidy sum compared to a nqt

Wolfiefan Thu 08-Oct-15 18:52:10

I really can't see what you aim to get from this thread. We don't know the teacher or why they have been signed off. I can understand taking your concerns about the impact this is having on the class to a meeting with the Head. It's not unreasonable to expect good standards of behaviour and hw set.
FWIW after nearly 20 years the job made me so sick with depression that my eldest child feared I might kill myself. (Happy to say that was never going to happen.) I think if your health prevents you doing the job long term then you should leave. As I had to.

Badders123 Thu 08-Oct-15 18:55:00

My fils best friend did this.
He was a teacher and was signed off with "stress"
During this time he was on full pay (used to brag about it) and helped his wife set up her own business.
When he couldn't get away with it anymore he took early retirement on a good pension.
Nice work if you can get it.

Badders123 Thu 08-Oct-15 18:55:57

Wolfe...yes.
My dear friend left teaching in July.
It was the right thing to do, it was making her ill.

mathanxiety Thu 08-Oct-15 18:59:15

Two of my DCs had this with a teacher who had terrible back problems requiring numerous surgeries and recuperation time. Eventually the school found a good sub, on standby. The back problems were finally fixed and all was well for a year and a half. Then same teacher got pregnant, had to go on bedrest, and the school found the previous good sub had got herself a permanent job. So they hired the daughter of the secretary, who had a degree in music education, and the class languished.

What is wrong with the teacher doesn't matter.

What matters is why the school can't find a good sub.

tiggytape Thu 08-Oct-15 19:01:25

What sickness benefits do teachers have? How can this be still happening?
At a wild guess, I'd say it is because the teacher has a reoccurring illness, a long term illness, an ongoing course of treatment or complications that keep requiring time off - either because they are physically too ill to work, are in hospital or are immunosupressed due to treatment or illness so cannot be in a school. That's why it is still happening.

Or are you querying it is genuine illness at all (the complaints about the teacher having done nothing to prepare for the new term - well teachers can be too sick to work all through August too)?

Or are you saying that someone in that position should be sacked (someone with ongoing complications, treatment or illness that makes it impossible for them to work)?

If there are problems in class as a result of a teacher's illness, then that is for the Head to resolve.
So if you are not happy at how it is being handled then that is a legitimate concern to raise with the Head. However why the teacher is off and what they are being paid is none of your business except it is safe to say, it must be genuinely awful for them right now and I am sure they're not happy about it either.

tiggytape Thu 08-Oct-15 19:10:46

OP said "It's not been mental anxiety type illness in the previous three years."

The other issue with teaching is that it doesn't lend itself to a quick recouperation and return to work.
For example any treatment that requires steroids or chemo means avoiding contact with young children as far as possible. So whereas an accountant who sits alone in an office all day might be allowed to return with care, a teacher will have stay away and be signed off for the entire time.
And if it is an illness or post surgery that means avoiding standing and moving around too much, again a teacher is going to return to work much later than an office worker or someone else.

KinkyDorito Thu 08-Oct-15 19:14:00

They can redeploy. They can challenge multiple absences over a long period of time as capability. It can be done.

Perhaps there is more going on that you aren't aware of?

I am a teacher. If my child was in a class like you describe, I would be asking to meet the Head in order to know what was happening - what school were doing about it. Whether the teacher is ill or not, ultimately someone should be teaching those children effectively and the school needs that in place.

Who is covering currently?

This is spot on:

What is wrong with the teacher doesn't matter.

What matters is why the school can't find a good sub.

mrz Thu 08-Oct-15 19:19:16

You are entitled to less sick benefit when you first start teaching and it increases with year's employed up to 20 weeks benefit.
As others have said the teacher will need a doctors certificate and after so many weeks (varies slightly ) the teacher will asked to attend a medical.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now