Talk

Advanced search

NC levels question

(9 Posts)
Bonsoir Wed 17-Dec-14 16:40:58

I am well aware that NC levels are being abandoned but I have a somewhat hypothetical question I need an answer to: a DC at Level 5c for Reading and Level 5b for Writing in December of Year 5 could be expected to attain what levels in Reading and Writing by the end of Year 6?

diamondage Wed 17-Dec-14 17:25:13

This blog post from FFT might be helpful for you to read.

From The School Run: The [new SAT] tests will now be marked with a score on a standardised scale, ranging from 80 to 130. A score of 100 is the expected outcome at the end of Year 6, indicating that children are ready for secondary school.

For writing, which will be teacher assessed, the highest your child can achieve is Mastery. For reading they will either reach the required standard or not. In addition they will then have their scaled score, with the maximum being 130... at least I think that's an accurate summary of the information that's out there. Happy to be corrected by those more in the know.

redskybynight Wed 17-Dec-14 18:04:18

It's a how long is a piece of string question really. It depends on the child and how they've got here (if they've already made a level's worth of progress this year, it's unlikely to continue).

however in KS2 the generally quoted expected progress is 1 level over 2 years, so I guess somewhere between "where they are now" and "a level higher" is probably the answer you want. (this assumes they are taught to a level that they can get Level 6)

merlehaggard Wed 17-Dec-14 18:12:04

I'd say reading 5A/B and writing 5A/6C.

RafaIsTheKingOfClay Wed 17-Dec-14 18:53:26

I think probably another sub level by the end of year 5, then 1-2 sublevels across year 6. But as redsky says it's a bit of a how long is a piece of string question.

moonrocket Wed 17-Dec-14 19:02:20

I'd say 2 sub-levels per academic year.
Are you moving DD to England then?

Hulababy Wed 17-Dec-14 19:18:26

Expected result for end of y2 was 2b, end of y6 was 4b. So over 4 years = 2 levels or 6 sublevels. Meaning 1.5 sublevels per year or half a sublevel per term.

Obviously children's rates of progress are not really that linear though.

moonrocket Wed 17-Dec-14 20:49:24

Exactly - you'd expect a higher attainer to make accelerated progress.

Bonsoir Thu 18-Dec-14 07:25:40

Thank you everyone smile

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now