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English kumon and tutor dilema

(23 Posts)
honeydue3 Wed 17-Dec-14 13:10:15

Hi, My DS started English Kumon in November! Does anyone have a positive outcome from English Kumon? is it worth it and did your child progress in writing, spelling etc? planning to start the maths in the new year as i thought that would be more beneficial!
is it best to have a tutor instead as my DS is in year 4 which is when most start tutoring. Or maybe start with a tutor in year 5 and stick with the Kumon to at least secure the main areas first which should help with speed and accuracy.
Has anyone used Kumon to help with selective school exams?

ChlorinePerfume Wed 17-Dec-14 14:31:41

I doubt Kumon is going to ho much with 11+ or independent school entries tbh. I think it may be better to look for local 11+ tuition groups, make sure you check that they are working towards the test for the schools you are interested in ad they all vary greatly. My DDs went to a local tuition group. They started just after the Easter Holidays for September test and passed comfortably. I did not think it was necessary to start as early as year 4 but I kept on top of maths and English at home. Little but often.. I would suggest you find out what your exam board is and look at the syllabus..

Good luck. :-)

honeydue3 Thu 18-Dec-14 16:05:20

Anyone had a positive experience with Kumon?

greeneggsandjam Sun 21-Dec-14 11:58:38

I have only known people to start then give up. I did look into it myself but it seems they just sit in a room and work through worksheets and then you get to take them home and mark them, or is it that they mark the sheets there but don't actually provide any teaching? I cant quite remember. Anyway I decided it looked like a waste of time. I chose a computer based tuition centre for about a year and I figured that was a waste of money too. If you can afford it, go for a tutor.

LL12 Sun 21-Dec-14 18:22:01

All children that I know that have been to Kumon have hated it.
I have used a tutor twice before, once in a small group and once 121, If I needed to use one again I would def got for 121 again.

Willow33 Sun 21-Dec-14 21:43:58

Yes, my friend's ds did English at Kumon. He started when he was in yr 4 or 5. Anyway, as it wasnt as popular as maths, he got a lot of attention and my friend said he made a lot of progress.

Muskey Sun 21-Dec-14 21:51:04

Someone I know runs a kumon franchise she as no teaching qualifications and from my understanding all the children do are loads and loads of worksheets. It sounds exceptionally dull imo

lemisscared Sun 21-Dec-14 21:54:03

sounds like a giant rip off for pushy parents to me.

Moominmammacat Mon 22-Dec-14 15:37:16

Really not worth the money. You could do it yourself if you could be bothered. Very repetitive. My children did both for a short time, got very good at mental maths but no understanding/love of subject.

Feenie Tue 23-Dec-14 00:23:32

Ooh, a sane Kumon thread! Normally we get lots of suspicious first time posters lauding their awesomeness and getting nasty when anyone points that out. Nice to see a factual discussion for a change.

moonrocket Tue 23-Dec-14 00:34:26

I don't see how kumon will help your child with 11+, other than perhaps the maths for the speed. It seems as dull as ditchwater, and doesn't teach them actual knowledge from what I've seen of my DC's friends that do it. (most steer well clear of kumon as we're an 11+ area)

Certainly the kumon type tutoring would be useless for the independent selectives in our area.

Artistic Tue 23-Dec-14 01:02:44

Tried Kumon - first maths then English. All it did was help DD sit still & do some work with concentration. It's very repetitive (I find it mind numbing tbh), and was ruining her love for maths & providing no understanding or comcepts. So stopped that. English - again it was undoing the schools good work of phonetic spelling by doing more of 'memory' spelling. Stopped that too. DD is doing well now, albeit slower than Kumon speed levels. She has great love for her subjects & loves understanding them. The school works on speed challenges...so that's getting taken care of too.

Artistic Tue 23-Dec-14 01:04:15

I must add that Kumon provided no help towards 7+, so I guess the same would apply for 11+. Tutoring is definitely going to help more.

Tron123 Tue 23-Dec-14 01:31:38

I think kumon is excellent for securing knowledge but you have to keep at it and unless parents are prepared to support and ensure the set work is done there is little point. Where it has the support it works extremely well and after 6 months or so the children begin to see the benefits

HeartsTrumpDiamonds Tue 23-Dec-14 01:38:07

Kumon is a massive waste of time and money and can do more harm than good and is completely useless when it comes to the 7+ or 11+.

Tron123 Tue 23-Dec-14 06:50:58

I am interested why you think it does more harm than good as surely any additional maths cannot have a negative effect

lemisscared Tue 23-Dec-14 09:33:34

I can see how it would have a negative effect and my child hasn't done kumon. They will be teaching in the "kumon" way, whatever that is, and from this thread it would appear not particularly brilliant. Have you ever tried helping your child with their homework only to find that she school are teaching it in a completely different way to you do it and you end up with a face like confused. You then have to either find out how the school are doing it or step back because you'll confuse them and undo the schools teachings. Additional maths is good, so long as its not over done, but only if its using the same/similar methods to those taught by the school.

I have a private tutor for my DD because she is dyslexic, her tutor is an ed psych and specialises in dyslexia, the improvement in her reading is amazing but it is £££. It is worth every penny but there is no way i would be forking out that sort of money for my DD to sit and work through worksheets - i can do that at home with a book from whsmith.

shahidhussain12 Tue 23-Dec-14 15:09:09

Message deleted by MNHQ. Here's a link to our Talk Guidelines.

Tron123 Tue 23-Dec-14 18:35:07

Surely the kumon method is mainstream anyway as it used at secondary schools. Some of the primary methods such as number lines are really only stepping stones to these methods. It is the practice that makes repetitive methods work, which I agree could happen at school rather than kumon. Primary maths seems to jump about so much and does not give good grounding eg sometimes tables is taught as 3,6,9,12,15 with no 1s 3 is 3, 2 3s are 6 etc which means children do not know them properly

Artistic Wed 24-Dec-14 13:36:40

Tron - we did Kumon maths for 9 months & were very optimistic about it. However I found that the entire emphasis of Kumon is on speed & accuracy & not on method or understanding. My DD was getting to a point where she knew 2+9=11 but couldn't explain how she got it. So basically it was getting her to 'memorise' maths. With small numbers & multiplication this is probably ok (perhaps needed) but when she got to 20s & was still being expected to work at a speed that demanded answers from memory, I was as to see why it's 'wrong' to do maths this way. Also the tutors offered no method or guidance they just let the children 'remember' or 'figure out' answers themselves. It was all too wrong! My DD's school reach maths beautifully & I felt that I was causing her more harm than good by practising with Kumon. As a trial I stopped Kumon for a month & helped DD practise with Bond books & Letts papers. She loved it!!

The main difference I found is that Kumon allows you to get your child practise without much parental involvement..apart from checking in the end. With the other methods, parental involvement needs to be much more as you may need to explain sums, they works etc & define how much DC need to do & track it etc. So I realised that Kumon is an easy way out for parents but its definitely not the best way for the child.

Am not being judgemental of other parents who use Kumon, just sharing my experience since you've asked.

Tron123 Wed 24-Dec-14 13:42:07

I think it is interesting how any form of additional maths is approached, and the methods used depend, I do think that some of the school based methods in their effort to show why fail to ensure the basics are secure ie tables. I think parent involvement varies with all additional help and that can vary and be small or large not according to the scheme or tutition but to e individual parent. Not sure I would argue that kumo. Is the easy way out in fact I do not think there are any easy ways out to ensure that a child progresses as it all takes time and effort

Artistic Wed 24-Dec-14 13:43:18

Sorry for my spelling errors, typing with one hand while feeding my baby smile

Also I met another mom (I didn't know this lady before but got chatting), she had 2 DC who had done all levels of Kumon maths..but for her 3rd child she was exploring other methods. When I asked why I was shocked to her her say that she regretted using Kumon for her older children. Coz they (teenagers) were now very fast at maths but unfortunately make too many mistakes & are now unable to step back & understand or even slow down to avoid errors. They are now frustrated with maths after having spent years with Kumon!

littlenicky61 Wed 24-Dec-14 15:37:08

I've got quite a few friends who have all used Kumon for maths and have been disappointed . They found their kids could recite for example 5 times 6 = 30 but were unable to apply this knowledge eg 5 children each had 6 lollipops how many altogether. School also said to one mum that Kumon was actually having a negative affect with her child as Kumon was teaching her child a different method to the school method and child was ( understandably ) getting confused . This particular mum stopped Kumon when her daughter actually got moved down a set in maths . I think ( personally ) one to one tutoring is more effective to kumon

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