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Sound finder?

(47 Posts)
tigrou Wed 19-Nov-14 15:12:59

I am looking for something to help my (dyslexic) dd with her writing - something that lists the spelling patterns associated with each sound, so that she can have them in front of her to chose from, while she's writing.
Essentially, what I am interested in is the vowels sounds, and something highly visual, so that when, for example, she wants to write /ai/, she can see the various possibilities... I was just going to make something myself, but before I reinvent the wheel, does anyone know whether such as thing already exists?
Thanks

mrz Wed 19-Nov-14 15:45:27

sounds-write.co.uk/docs/sounds_write_common_spellings_of_the_consonants_and_vowels.pdf

mrz Wed 19-Nov-14 15:47:26

22.8.11.pdf

maizieD Wed 19-Nov-14 16:56:29

Or you could try www.phonicsinternational.com

There is a range of charts available from this site. This is a Google images search result which shows many of the charts so you could chose one that looks the most helpful . I believe that most of them (if not all) are free of charge.
tinyurl.com/nv4eyc5

Not that there's anything wrong with the charts mrz linked; I just thought you might want pictures or exemplar words on a chart..

mrz Wed 19-Nov-14 17:00:12

The Phonics international are great charts I just find them too large to have on desks for individual children. Both the Sounds ~Write and Phonics books charts provide exemplar words and fit on an A4 sheet.

Mashabell Wed 19-Nov-14 17:14:44

I have produced a chart which gives all the spellings for each of the 44 English sounds in alphabetical order of their main spellings.
I'll paste it in, but because the MN system does not allow for formatting of letters within words, it won't come out very well.

U might find it useful for copying and adapting any way u wish. If not, just ignore it.

The 44 English sounds all have main spellings and variant spellings.
Some sounds, have two main spellings (ou, -ow: out, now) or even three, like /ai/ have three main spellings (*a-e*, -ay and ai *before n*: date, day, rain).

(The figures in brackets show how many of the 7,000 most used English words which I have analysed use that spelling - and how many spell it differently.)
1. a: cat – plait, meringue (466 – 3)
2. a-e: plate – wait, weight, straight, great, table dahlia, fete (338 – 69)
-ain: rain – lane, vein, reign, champagne (39 – 19)
-ay: play – they, weigh,ballet,cafe, matinee (35 – 20)
3. air: care – hair, bear, aerial, their, there, questionnaire (31-are – 27 other)
4. ar: car – are + (Southern Engl. bath) (138 – 1)
5. au: sauce – caught, bought,always, tall, crawl (44 au – 76 other)
-aw: saw – (0)- but in UK 11-aw + 40 awe, or, four, sore, war
6. b: bed (0)
7. ca/o/u: cat, cot, cut – character, kangaroo, queue (1022 – 33)
cr/cl: crab/ clot – chrome, chlorine (192 – 10)
-c: lilac –stomach, anorak (89 – 9)
-ck: neck –cheque, rec (62 – 6)
k: kite/ kept – chemistry (124 – 7)
-k: seek –unique (36 – 5)
-sk: risk –disc, mosque (86 – 10)
qu: quick – acquire, choir (78 – 4)
x: fix – accept, except, exhibit (98 – 15)

8. ch: chest – cello (155 – 1)
-tch: clutch – much (24 – 7)
9 d: dad – add, blonde (1,010 – 3)

10. e: end– head, any, said, Wednesday, friend, leisure,
leopard, bury (301 – 67)
11. er: her – turn, bird, learn, word, journey (70er – 124)
12. ee: eat– eel, even, ceiling, field, police,people,
me, key,ski, debris, quay (152ea – 304)
--y: jolly– trolley, movie, corgi (475 – 39)

13. f: fish– photo, stuff, rough (580 - 44)
14. g: garden– ghastly, guard (171– 28)
15. h: house– who (237 – 4)

16. i: ink– mystery, pretty, sieve, women, busy, build (421 – 53)
17. i-e: bite – might, style, mild, kind, eider, height, climb
island indict sign (278 – 76)
-y: my – high,pie, rye, buy, I, eye (17 – 14)

18. j: jam/ jog/ jug (0)
jelly, jig – gentle, ginger (18 – 20)
-ge: gorge (0)
-dg: fidget– digit (29 – 11)

19. l: last– llama (1,945 – 1)
20: m: mum– dumb, autumn (1,128 – 19)
21. n: nose– knot, gone, gnome, mnemonic (2,312 – 34)
22. -ng: ring (0)
23. o: on– cough, sausage, gone(357 – 5)
want – wont (19 – 1); quarrel– quod (10 -1)
24. o-e: mole – bowl, roll, soul; old – mould
boast, most, goes, mauve (171 – 100)
-o: no –toe, dough, sew, cocoa, pharaoh, oh, depot (106 – 59)
25. oi: oil– oyster (29 –1)
-oy: toy –buoy (12 – 1)
26. oo (long): food– rude, shrewd, move, group, fruit, truth, tomb,
blue, do, shoe,through, manoeuvre (94 – 108)

27. oo (short): good– would, put, woman, courier (15 -21)
28. or: order– board, court; wart, quart– worn, quorn (188 – 16)
-ore:more – soar, door, four, war, swore,abhor (23– 17)
+ (14 –aw/awe in UK)
29. ou: out– town (74 – 24);
-ow: now – plough (11 – 4)

30. p: pin (0)
31. r: rug– rhubarb, write (1,670 – 27)
32. s: sun – centre,scene (138 – 49)
-ce: face – case; fancy– fantasy (153 – 65)

33. sh: shop – chute, sure, moustache, liquorice (166 – 30)
-tion: ignition– mission, pension, suspicion,fashion (216 – 81)

34. t: tap, pet – pterodactyl, two, debt (1,398 – 4)
--te: delicate – democrat (52 – 3)

35. th (sharp): this (0)
36. th (soft): thing (0)

37. u: up– front, some, couple, blood (308 – 68)
38. u-e: cute – you,newt, neutral, suit, beauty, Tuesday, nuclear (137 – 21)
-ue: cue –few, view,menu (20– 22)

39. v: van (0)
-ve: have –spiv (116– 3) [80 with surplus –e]
-v-: river– chivvy (73 – 7) – v/vv after short vowel

40. w: window– which (216 – 31)
41. y: yak– use (31 – 11)
42. z: zip– xylophone (16 – 1)
-se: rose –froze (85– 33)
wise– size (UK 31 – 3, US 11 – 22)
43. zh: -si-/-su-: vision, measure – azure (20 – 3)

44. Unstressed, unclear vowel sound (or schwa),
occurring mainly in 8 endings and 2 prefixes:
-able: loveable– credible(33 – 17)
-ccle: bundle (2 consonants + -le for -l) (0)
-al: vertical– novel, anvil, petrol (200+ – 32)
-ary: ordinary– machinery, inventory, century,carpentry(37 – 55)
-en: fasten– abandon, truncheon, orphan, goblin, certain (73 – 132)
-ence: absence– balance (33 – 26)
-ent: absent – pleasant (176 – 58)
-er: father –author, armour, nectar, centre, injure,quota (UK 340, US 346 – 135/129)
butcher – picture (42 –ure)
de-: decide – divide (57 – 29)
in-: indulge – endure (73 – 30)

+ Consonant doubling rule for showing short, stressed vowels
merry (regular) – very(missing) – serrated(surplus)
(503 - 601 - 219)

Feenie Wed 19-Nov-14 19:34:10

Reported.

Mashabell Wed 19-Nov-14 19:42:47

Whatever for, Feenie?
The OP wrote,
something that lists the spelling patterns associated with each sound.
My chart shows all the different ways each of the 44 English sounds can be spelt.
So what have i done wrong by posting it in response to someone who was asking for one?
It's MY chart which i produced after many years of meticulous work.

Feenie Wed 19-Nov-14 19:55:00

Your chart is a)confusing b)wrong and c)spam

You have been warned not to spam your lists - yet you have posted it twice in two days.

Reported.

LuckyLopez Wed 19-Nov-14 20:02:47

Gosh I thought it was just me. I don't like that list at all sorry Marsha. Lots of errors and not at all child (or adult) friendly.

tigrou Thu 20-Nov-14 08:41:15

Thank you for those examples - it's useful to see each sound grouped together, but they are all way too detailed for my needs right now.
In my opinion, English is too irregular to apply a code to every single word. My dd just needs to focus on the main spellings. So I will use the information to make something of my own.

Mashabell Thu 20-Nov-14 12:46:10

Tigrou

I am glad that u think
^ it's useful to see each sound grouped together^.

Many other listings give just the spellings which are taught in the early years.

I realise that
they are all way too detailed
for your needs right now but thought u can take what u neeed, without having to start from scratch.

U are of course right to think that
English is too irregular to apply a code to every single word.

The figures in brackets show u which spelling patterns are very strong, with no or so few exceptions as be almost completely regular.

Some though have so many exceptions that they can't really be called patterns at all. For those, it's a matter of what Debbie Hepplewhite calls 'building up word banks'.

mrz Thu 20-Nov-14 17:40:24

The charts are the main spellings your child will need to know tigrou

maizieD Thu 20-Nov-14 17:46:58

I am glad that u think
^ it's useful to see each sound grouped together^.

Many other listings give just the spellings which are taught in the early years.

You know, marsha, you are so out of touch with SP programmes it is unbelieveable.

mrz Thu 20-Nov-14 18:24:50

How old is your child tigrou?

tigrou Fri 21-Nov-14 08:37:49

mrz she is 9, but in a bilingual school outside the UK, with only has 6 hours of English teaching per week. She covered sounds/spellings in class, but her knowledge isn't sufficiently consolidated for her to use it when writing, because she doesn't have the same support and input as she has in her other language.
I just want a quick visual tool to show her the main spellings for certain sounds (essentially the long vowels), so she doesn't have to rely on her memory, as her working memory is rapidly saturated when writing.
I can make what I want using the lists you linked.
I'll also be working with her teacher on ideas for consolidating the basics.

Mashabell Fri 21-Nov-14 10:35:20

Tigrou: I just want a quick visual tool to show her the main spellings for certain sounds (essentially the long vowels)

Perhaps the following will be clearer and more helpful to u?
It gives just the long vowel spellings, but on this system it is impossible to show them really clearly. U could reduce the different spellings to just two or three main ones.

/ai/: a-e - ai, eigh, aigh, ea, a, a h, e-e
plate – wait, eight, straight, great, apron, dahlia, fete (338 – 69)
-ain (before –n) - a-e, ei, eig, agne
rain – lane, vein, reign, champagne (39 – 19)
-ay (in endings) – ey, eigh, et, e, ee
play – they, weigh, ballet, cafe, matinee (35 – 20)

/air/: are - air, ear, aer, eir, ere, aire
care – hair, bear, aerial, their, there, questionnaire (31-are – 27 other)

/ar/: ar – are
car – are (138 – 1) + (Southern Engl. bath, ask, etc.)

/au/: au – augh, ough, a, al, aw
sauce – caught, bought, always, tall, crawl (44 au – 76 other)
-aw (in endings): saw – (0)- but in UK 11-aw + 40 awe, or, four, sore, war


/er/: er - ur, ir, ear, or, our
her – turn, bird, learn, word, journey (70er – 124others)

/ee/: ea - ee, e-e, ei, ie, i-e, eo, e, ey, i, is, ay
eat – eel, even, ceiling, field, police, people, me, key, ski, debris, quay (152ea – 304)
--y: (in unstressed endings) – ey, ie, i
jolly – trolley, movie, corgi (475 – 39)



/i-e/ : i-e - igh, y-e, i, ei, eye, eigh, i-b, is, ic, ig
bite – might, style, I, eider, eye, height, climb, island, indict, sign (278 – 76)
-y (in endings) - igh, ie, ye, uy
my – high, pie, rye, buy (17 – 14)

/o-e/: o-e – ow, ol, ou, o, oa, oe, au
mole – bowl, roll, soul, most, boast, goes, mauve (171 – 100)
-o (in endings) - oe, ough, ew, oa, aoh, oh, ot
no – toe, dough, sew, cocoa, pharaoh, oh, depot (106 – 59)

/oi/: oi - oy
oil– oyster (29 –1)
-oy (in endings) - uoy
toy – buoy (12 – 1)

/oo/ (long): oo - u-e, ew, o-e, ou, ui, u, o-b, ue, o, oe, ough, oeu
food – rude, shrewd, move, group, fruit, truth, tomb, blue, do, shoe, through, manoeuvre
(94 – 108)

/oo/ (short): oo - oul, u, o, ou
good– would, put, woman, courier (15oo -21others)

/or/: or - oar, our,
order – board, court;
wart, quart– worn, quorn (188 – 16)
-ore (in endings) - oar, oor, our, ar, or
more – soar, door, four, war, abhor (23– 17)
+ (14 –aw/awe in UK)
/ou/: ou - ow
out – town (74 – 24);
-ow (in endings)
now – plough (11 – 4)


/u-e/: u-e - you, ew, eu, ui, eau, ue, u
cute – youth, newt, neutral, suit, beauty, Tuesday, nuclear (137 – 21)
-ue (in endings) - ew, iew, u
cue – few, view, menu (20 –ue – 22not )

Mashabell Fri 21-Nov-14 11:03:15

Tigrou
I have sent u a personal message via MN as well.

mrz Fri 21-Nov-14 16:46:56

If you want her to read and spell accurately in English she will need to know all the alternatives on the charts (either those I linked to or the ones suggested by maizieD ... But definitely not masha' strange lists!)

Mashabell Mon 24-Nov-14 16:53:57

Mrz: she will need to know all the alternatives on the charts.

Many, perhaps even most, very competent spellers of English would be very pushed to produce all the different ways English sounds can be spelt, because they simply learn to link them to particular words. - Even if u know them all, what matters is which ones apply to particular words.

In my last post i simply gave all the different spellings for the long English vowels (+short /oo/), as Tigrou had requested.

What do u find strange about them?

mrz Mon 24-Nov-14 17:03:55

Most competent spellers are able to relate the written form of the sounds in words whether consciously or not. We all break words down to times to help us spell unfamiliar words. Unfortunately it's impossible to memorise every word in the english language and no one is a perfect speller.

Galena Mon 24-Nov-14 17:04:51

Would something like this help her?

mrz Mon 24-Nov-14 17:09:10

Perhaps bizarre is a better word than strange to describe your lists masha. Perhaps you can explain why you use a mixture of phonemes and rimes?

Mashabell Mon 24-Nov-14 18:15:45

They are all phonemes, Mrz.

The first one is the /ai/ sound,
for which the main spelling is an open a or 'a-e'. - The variants for it are 'ai, eigh, eigh, ea, a, ah, e-e', as in the words 'wait, eight, straight, great, apron, dahlia, fete'.
Before n the main spelling is ai (as in 'rain') - with the exceptions a-e, ei, eig, agne (lane, vein, reign, champagne).
In endings, the main spelling is -ay (play) - with the exceptions -ey, -eigh, -et, -e, ee (they, weigh, ballet, cafe, matinee).

The figures in brackets tell u how many of the 7,000 most used English words which i analysed use the main spellings - and how many have other spellings.

Hence:
/ai/: a-e - ai, eigh, aigh, ea, a, ah, e-e
plate – wait, eight, straight, great, apron, dahlia, fete (338 – 69)
-ain (before –n) - a-e, ei, eig, agne
rain – lane, vein, reign, champagne (39 – 19)
-ay (in endings) – ey, eigh, et, e, ee
play – they, weigh, ballet, cafe, matinee (35 – 20)

mrz Mon 24-Nov-14 18:29:34

No masha they aren't all phonemes! "ain" is two sounds /ai/ and /n/ ...

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