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Scottish Primary School teachers

(16 Posts)
Jinty64 Sat 25-May-13 15:18:53

Two times table.

Do we say: - one two is two, two twos are four, three twos are six etc

Or

Do we say: - two ones are two, two twos are four, two threes are six etc.

Just want to get it right.

emacp Sat 25-May-13 15:23:03

it is the two times tables so you say:
2 ones are 2
2 twos are 4
2 threes are 6 etc

just as for the 3 times all begin with 3
for the 4 times all begin with 4
for the 5 times all begin with 5 etc

are we seeing a pattern here?

hope this helps

ilovepowerhoop Sat 25-May-13 15:23:57

we do it the second way. I am not a teacher but went to school in Scotland and have 2 children at school here too.

Euphemia Sat 25-May-13 15:25:03

We teach them both ways, so that the children understand the commutative law i.e. it doesn't matter which way round you perform the operation, you get the same answer.

ilovepowerhoop Sat 25-May-13 15:25:55

dh was taught the other way at school in England. We have a times table poster and it says on it that it is the Scottish version so I gather the English version shows them the other way.

bettycoast Sat 25-May-13 15:26:30

You can even google "scottish times tables" and it comes up the "right" way as emcap says.

My children are bi-lingual in their times tables <<preen>>

Jinty64 Sat 25-May-13 16:42:22

That's great, thank you. Ds (P2) is interested and will be starting this term so I am "talking" about it. I wanted to get it right.

Just out of interest is this about the usual time to start times tables (final term P2)

Euphemia Sat 25-May-13 16:46:57

Depends on the children, Jinty. At my school the P2s know the doubles to 20, but they haven't explicitly been taught the two times table. We're just starting the 2, 5 and 10 times tables with P3.

sweetkitty Sat 25-May-13 16:53:02

Mine started the times tables proper in P3 we say

Two nothings are nothing
Two ones are two
Two twos are four
Two threes are six

I didn't know there was another way grinwink

sjuperyoni Sat 25-May-13 16:53:52

You've caused a mass debate here hmm i, dp and our dc pkus dsis, her fp and dc say one 2 is 2 two twos are four... my dsis is confudled you'd even bring two 1s into it as they aren't twos - they make two but are not twos therefore don't count.

all scottish, schooled in scotland with dcs being schooled in scotland.

Euphemia Sat 25-May-13 16:54:40

Nothings???!!! No no no no no! shock

WeAllHaveWings Sat 25-May-13 17:14:21

ds started learning the basics of multiplication in P2 but didn't start reciting tables until P3

Jinty64 Sat 25-May-13 17:21:31

sjuperyoni this is why I posted as I was told it was done one way in England and the other in Scotland but no one seemed to know which way was which. I have two older ds's but asking them was as good as useless.

Euphemia we got an A4 typed sheet home a couple of weeks ago telling us what they would be covering this term and it said "learning two times table for some". Ds is in the top maths group so I took that to mean him. He has just done counting in 2's, 5's and 10's so I think that will be right.

sjuperyoni Sat 25-May-13 17:23:47

My heads burst with this confused i'm right grin

Euphemia Sat 25-May-13 17:26:44

Yes, we always start with 2, 5 and 10.

I'm revising doubles with P3 (bottom group) and doing halves as well. I want them to really understand the numbers, not just be able to recite the tables parrot-fashion.

Jinty64 Sat 25-May-13 18:58:41

I'm good with reading and writing but not sure about maths. When my other ds's were younger the school held a maths evening with different tables for each year. It was great and easy to follow. I have suggested a couple of times that something similar would be good but I don't suppose they have the time to arrange it.

I would love to know more about what they are learning.

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