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Is there really a shortage of Primary jobs?

(19 Posts)
Inclusionist Tue 11-Dec-12 08:48:56

There seem to be lots of jobs being advertised in my area, and the same job gets advertised for several weeks suggesting they don't get 600 applications on the day the advert appears!

In fact the more 'challenging' seem to be really struggling to recruit. I know because I work in one!!

Is it just a regional problem?

juniper904 Tue 11-Dec-12 18:44:11

It's not the normal time of year for teachers to change jobs though, is it?

What's it like in your area come May?

lljkk Tue 11-Dec-12 18:47:29

I know a local school that for love or money cannot get a HT. High ability in take & results, lovely village primary, not too small or big.

And took ages for local secondary to get a HT, too.

Maybe it depends what job they're advertising.

cumbrialass Tue 11-Dec-12 19:01:00

No-one wants to be a Head, especially in a small village primary! Many also teach and, although the school may be smaller, the paperwork isn't! Many Heads in small schools don't earn that much more than a top of scale teacher anyway, certainly Head of Subject in a nearby secondary earns more than our Head.
Conversely, I applied for teaching post, along with over 400 others! When we advertise, even for temporary posts we can get hundreds of applicants. So I think it depends where in the country you are and what the post offers!

Inclusionist Tue 11-Dec-12 19:04:50

It must be regional then.

My MIL retired her primary Headship last year and it took several rounds of recruitment attemps to get a replacement.

I wish I could have just two of the other 399 applicants to fill my posts cumbrialass!

mrz Tue 11-Dec-12 19:12:37

Just checked my LEA job section and there isn't a single teaching position advertised

cumbrialass Tue 11-Dec-12 19:20:00

My county currently has one full time and two part time vacancies advertised-I work in one of the largest counties in the country!

exoticfruits Tue 11-Dec-12 19:33:28

They are like all other jobs at the moment-difficult to get and too many applicants after every one. Headships are different-people don't want to be Heads of small schools-they want a life!

teacherwith2kids Tue 11-Dec-12 19:39:46

Inclusionist - as others have said, Headships are different, and nobody is applying for those.

In terms of teaching roles - there are definitel recruitment 'seasons' as teachers in a role have to give half a term's notice. So a job being advertised now can only be filled by a teacher who is not currently employed - perhaps an NQT who has not yet secured a job, or a supply teacher looking for a longer-term role. The pool of applicants is therefore relatively small, and tbh may be of relatively low quality, as really good NQTs will have gained positions earlier in the year and anyone in a job (however much they might dislike it) can't apply. A school which doesn't want an NQT, e.g. if they are in Special Measures or already have many inexperienced staff, may have very few appointable applicants.

Jobs advertised in the main 'seasons' - before half term each term, plus some catching new graduates in July do have huge numbers of applicants still.

Inclusionist Tue 11-Dec-12 19:53:41

I know teacherwith2kids- I'm on SMT!

These two vacancies I need filling (will be under my line management)- are quite specialist roles with challenge, responsibility cv points and additional money attached but they have been vacant this whole academic year, having been first advertised before the summer holidays, with no suitable applicants! Where is everybody? Or is it only nice leafy/rural schools with a view that have waiting list of applicants.

I like a rough and tumble school, me. There must be others!

mrz Tue 11-Dec-12 20:01:10

We are a "rough and tumble" school and had hundreds of applicants for the last few positions we've advertised

PartridgeInARustyBearTree Tue 11-Dec-12 20:11:34

I work in a school in a nice leafy town, and we don't get a lot of NQT applicants straight out of college for our jobs because they can't afford to live here on an NQT's pay.

EuphemiaInExcelsis Tue 11-Dec-12 20:12:13

It seems to depend on the area. Some regions advertise all the time; others have surplus numbers on their supply lists and often restrict applications to internal candidates whom they can then shaft by paying crappy supply wages for a temporary contract.

I was four years on supply in a region that never advertised posts; I moved elsewhere and had two permanent job offers within six months.

RiversideMum Wed 12-Dec-12 07:28:41

Where I am there are 2 maternity covers, a PT SENCo and a 0.1 (!!!) class teacher.

amistillsexy Wed 12-Dec-12 07:41:52

Where in the country are you, inclusionist?

Inclusionist Wed 12-Dec-12 08:56:10

A not particularly salubrious area that is close enough to London to be very expensive to live in. I guess that's the issue!

Inclusionist Wed 12-Dec-12 10:57:24

The Guardian is carrying 1196 Primary jobs which I think is a lot, considering, as it has been pointed out, it is right before Chrismas. A very quick flick suggests the majority are in inner or outer London (where I am) so I conclude it is reginonal!

amistillsexy Wed 12-Dec-12 13:09:55

That's a shame, Inclusionist, I was about to offer my services, but I'm up North, so no good to you! grin

I think it's always been a regional thing, though, hasn't it? When I fisrt qualified, in the eighties, there was a terrible shortage of jobs, and no movement at all in the 'nice' areas. I spent my first year struggling along with supply jobs, and then had to join an NQT pool in my second year. Thankfully, I was given a job in a great school where I stayed for eleven years!

The job situation in the area where I live is poor, but there are a couple of new ones each week.

Claifairy Wed 12-Dec-12 13:57:26

There are only ever maternity cover roles in our area. My friends who is a Primary school teacher says movement is impossible around here unless you are willing to drive miles or move out of area.

We are up North though!

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