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phonics for dummies ?

(38 Posts)
bananacarnival Sun 11-Nov-12 23:25:48

Is there a quick page that someone could kindly send me a link to? I need to get to grips with all of the terminology. For my children, but I'm also going back into a job that's in education and I need to be aware of the latest initiatives. My google search is not going well...

Thanks

ninah Sun 11-Nov-12 23:35:09

are you kidding? there's loads of info out there
just google letters and sounds
good website - phonics play

learnandsay Sun 11-Nov-12 23:41:57

Talk to mrz on this forum. She'll fill you up with phonics terms till you're blue in the face. Personally I think the theoretical side of phonics is a bit weird and stupid. So you might want to learn it here on the job from an expert rather than read it from a book. Because a book will tell you the theory but in life you actually have to do it, and in my brief experience the two aren't the same at all.

(In practice I think phonics/( or sounding out words) is fantastic, up to a limit.)

ninah Sun 11-Nov-12 23:45:30

no I definitely disagree with that learn and say
nothing weird, it's logical and practical - and it works!

learnandsay Sun 11-Nov-12 23:52:46

Does it?

Explain the "e" sound in women.
How does the word Wymondham work phonetically?
How does a child work out what Achaeans sounds like?

The objections go on and on. As a holistic theory of how our language either works or sounds phonics is a bit rubbish. But for breaking down individual words it's great.

learnandsay Sun 11-Nov-12 23:55:13

Not the "e" the "i" in the "wom" part of the word.

AlienRefluxovermypoppy Sun 11-Nov-12 23:56:46

I live near Wymondham smile pronounced it how it's looks when I first moved here blush much to DP's amusement.

AlienRefluxovermypoppy Sun 11-Nov-12 23:57:52

Also went to a phonics workshop the other day, was confused as hell when I left.

ninah Sun 11-Nov-12 23:57:59

the e sound in women is like the e sound in men
it's the o sound that might come as more of a surprise
w y as in i mondham?
A ch as in c ae as in ee ans? (hardly a high frequency word you have to admit)
it isn't a holistic theory. It's a tool for early readers. Night night!

learnandsay Sun 11-Nov-12 23:58:03

Pronounced how it looks?

You live in: Weemondham?

AlienRefluxovermypoppy Sun 11-Nov-12 23:58:42

Pronounced Windum

ninah Sun 11-Nov-12 23:58:48

go on then alien, how do you say it? grin

ninah Sun 11-Nov-12 23:59:27

I raise you cockburns
nn

AlienRefluxovermypoppy Mon 12-Nov-12 00:00:13

co-burns?

ninah Mon 12-Nov-12 00:01:48

and very fine too! cheers!

learnandsay Mon 12-Nov-12 00:31:12

or ask an English person how you pronounce the Welsh double l.

GrrrArghZzzzYaayforall8nights Mon 12-Nov-12 00:45:15

I would look at which one your school is using at there are several programmes.

If you want a nuts and bolts understanding of phonics, Loring's Blend Phonics, freely available through Mr Potter gives a clear understanding of how it works as well as a light history and theory behind it.

bananacarnival Mon 12-Nov-12 09:38:49

Many thanks all
Going to check suggested sites

ALovelyBunchOfCoconuts Mon 12-Nov-12 12:28:31

Alphablocks grin

maverick Mon 12-Nov-12 14:17:34

I presume you're in the UK 'bananacarnival', in which case I wouldn't view publications on Don Potter's website as particularly relevant. We have a different understanding of synthetic phonics over here.

I do a one (very long) page description of UK-style synthetic phonics here, complete with ALL the jargon:
www.dyslexics.org.uk/main_method_3.htm

HTH

Feenie Mon 12-Nov-12 15:35:08

The Welsh have their own phonemes. Most languages do.

SoundsWrite Mon 12-Nov-12 16:00:31

'Explain the "e" sound in women.
How does the word Wymondham work phonetically?
How does a child work out what Achaeans sounds like?
The objections go on and on. As a holistic theory of how our language either works or sounds phonics is a bit rubbish. But for breaking down individual words it's great.'
If your definition of phonics is narrow, that's true, learnandsay, but a broader view is easily capable of explaining such anomalies. For example, Wymondham, which is pronounced 'Windum' is a very good example of what we do in English with quite a lot of place names and other words. 'Chocolate' is a word that springs readily to mind. What we do in words like this is to elide a syllable (choklut) or even syllables. However, although you wouldn't want to change the way these words are spoken in normal discourse, when one is spelling them, using a spelling voice - Wy mond ham - is very useful.
In the case of Achaeans, we take a number of spellings like the <ae>, to which you are presumably referring, from ancient Greek: thus, 'arch_ae_ology' and 'encyclop_ae_dia'. They are simply less frequent spellings of the sound 'ee' and of course you wouldn't teach them to young children unless they were very precocious.
So, phonics, well understood and well taught, is capable of explaining any word in the English language because all words contain sounds and all sounds have been assigned spellings.

mrz Mon 12-Nov-12 17:13:15

"So, phonics, well understood and well taught," is the key to success or otherwise wink

mrz Mon 12-Nov-12 17:55:05

bananacarnival what exactly do you want? A basic glossary?

bananacarnival Tue 13-Nov-12 10:21:14

Maverick that link is brilliant. Thanks so much!

Yes mrz, a glossary was what I was after too. Found an ok one on phonicsplay

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