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Bright boy, but you wouldn't know it from his written work

(4 Posts)
create Fri 24-Jun-11 18:17:25

DS1 is 10, goes into yr 6 in September.

I know I'm biased, but I do believe he's more than averagely intelligent. He reads very well, mental maths is good and he is interested in and understands science and nature etc. It's not just me, adults who run the cubs and kids clubs he go to often remark what a bright boy he is.

However, he was late to write at all, it's only really come in the last 12 months and is still untidy and slow. I finally got him referred to OT this time last year and there has been some support at school but it's been sporadic. Basically, when I go in and say hat can/will you do for DS, he gets some extra help for a week or two then it fizzles out. He does have a diagnosis for a physical problem that has caused is difficulties, but he should be able to write properly in time and with the right support

Also every year, when he goes into a new class, it seems to take 2 terms for the new teacher to realise they have a bright boy who struggles to write, rather than just a boy who can't write. I can't afford to let that happen in yr6

So I've got an appointment with the teacher on Monday. I think I need to be more assertive - up to now I've trusted the school to know what's best and do the right thing, but I now feel I've let DS down like that. Obviously as he gets older he'll be judged more and more on the quality of his writen work.

What do I need to get in place and what can I do to make sure there some continuity for next year? What is it reasonable for me to expect from the school?

countydurhamlass Fri 24-Jun-11 20:51:38

my ds is 7 and he really struggles with writing, the council's disability services have said "it doesnt come naturally to him". they have suggested that he writes on a tilted surface. ( a cheap option being to use a lever arch slanting away from him) to help him. also he tends to write with the paper straight and does not move it to an angle as he writes. they have recommends that some masking tape is put on the table at an angle showing how his paper should be. they have also provided basic pre-handwriting worksheets and basic handwriting sheets to help him practice at home. the other suggest was that he does more computer based work as this will help in secondary school as they tend to use computers more so he should practice his typing.

they have also purchased him one of those "stabilo easy" chuncky shaped pens to help him know where to put his fingers

all of these do not cost very much (or nothing) and helps immensley. perhaps suggest some of these ideas?

Izzy01 Fri 24-Jun-11 21:19:13

Hi Create,
That must be really frustrating for both you and your son. I work with and advise SENCOs (special educational needs coordinators) in primary and secondary schools. I suggest you do the following: Make sure the school have an IEP (individual education plan) in place for your son - these are generally coordinated by the school SENCO. If he doesn't, ask to meet with the SENCO and discuss any info you have from the OT with him/her and insist that any strategies/physical supports or exercises (consistent with OT suggestions) are put in place and stated on the IEP. ask for the IEP to be review half-termly. This way, your son's year 6 teacher should be aware of his needs from day 1 and both you and the schools will be regularly monitoring the support in place and progress made. If progress is not being made, request a follow-up appointment with OT to make sure that what was previously suggested is still relevant or if there's any other advice the OT can give.

Hassled Fri 24-Jun-11 22:29:00

If his fine motor skills are generally poor then you might find the Dyspraxia Foundation's website useful. My DS2 was taught to touch-type in Yr6 and now (Yr8) uses a laptop for all written work - it has been invaluable.

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