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Does moving into a new area put you on top of waiting list?

(20 Posts)
alittleteapot Fri 24-Jun-11 16:06:39

Have posted before - we failed to move in time for primary admissions process so dd has a place round here. If we move to a new area over the holidays will she be above people already on waiting list for places in local schools? Was freaking out about all this but seems like so many people are moving around this time that I feel it will work out ok. If necessary could drive her to school where she has a place as is only in next borough until she has a place. Advice welcome!

Thanks.

DurhamDurham Fri 24-Jun-11 16:12:47

No , she will be placed on the list but she won't jump ahead of those already on it smile

hoxtonchick Fri 24-Jun-11 16:15:10

if it's a community school, & places are allocated on distance (normally below children with statements, those looked after by local authority & siblings), you will be higher up the waiting list if you live nearer the school. ie if you move very close to the school you will be very high on the waiting list.

hoxtonchick Fri 24-Jun-11 16:15:51

and will be higher than people who applied before. when you apply doesn't make a difference, where you live does. but check out the admissions procedure in the borough you're moving to carefully.

OddBoots Fri 24-Jun-11 16:15:55

She will be on the list according to the school's admission criteria. So for example there may be Looked After children, siblings and those living closer than you above her and those living further away and out of contract after you.

meditrina Fri 24-Jun-11 16:16:29

She'll be put on the waiting list/s according to how well she fits the entrance criteria. So, for example, your distance to the school will be measured, and she'll be placed according to that. So she might go straight to the top, if you move next to the school; or further down depending on who else is waiting and the distance from the school they live. Her position on the waitingnlists could go up (when children above her accept places or move away), or down if there are new arrivals closer to the school or with siblings who have secured places higher up the school.

sunnyday123 Fri 24-Jun-11 16:24:31

agree with others, she will jump ahead of those on the list already providing she is higher on the admissions criteria for that school - regardless of when you applied etc

alittleteapot Fri 24-Jun-11 16:50:59

I thought she would go above people who already had a place at a local school, regardless of distance, i.e. if someone is 300m but didn't get in and got into the school that's 400m away, but who stayed on waiting list because it's their prefererred school, wouldn't dd go above them as having NO place in the borough, even though might live a bit further away?

mankyscotslass Fri 24-Jun-11 16:58:23

No, as far as I am aware they just apply the criteria equally to those on the list, even if they are already attending another local school.

So if A was at school X but on the list for school Y, and your DC was also on the list for school Y, the selection criteria would still be applied, and if A lived closer to school Y than you, they would be offered the place, regardless of having a place at another school already.

alittleteapot Fri 24-Jun-11 17:01:45

oh. <blood pressure rises again>. thanks.

hoxtonchick Fri 24-Jun-11 17:26:52

no, she won't get priority over others. but equally won't be disadvantaged by late application.

Isitreally Fri 24-Jun-11 18:44:00

No - there is no priority at all based on who has a place already and who has no other place.

The LA will have to find you a place at a school but you will not get preferential treatment at a school of your choosing from being new to the area.

It is 100% down to the admission criteria of the school. So if distance is a criteria and you move to a house 300m from the school anybody living 200m will still be above you even if they have a perfectly lovely, local school to go to already but want to hold out for that one.
And equally anybody 400m away will go below you on the list even if they've lived there for 15 years and applied months ago and have always expected their child to get a place living so close and think it's unfair that new people move a bit closer and bump them down the list.

alittleteapot Fri 24-Jun-11 20:54:48

so onwards with the dilemma, do we stay put in a flat which is becoming a squeeze but all sorted for a v good school or do we move to a house not knowing what will happen re school.

thanks for your info...

Isitreally Sun 26-Jun-11 11:43:16

You said that you have accepted a school place for your DD and could drive her there if you moved house. If you move, you won't lose the place you've already been offered and you could join the waiting list for the new school you want once you know your new address.
That way you could move, DD would have a good school to go to (albeit one you have to drive to) and she could stay there until a place at a good school local to your new house comes up.
The gamble of course is that a place at the local school may never come up or you might not be near enough to the top of the list to get any places that do become free.

mankyscotslass Sun 26-Jun-11 11:52:25

Isitreally is probably giving you the best option atm alittleteapot, for the moment anyway.

alittleteapot Mon 27-Jun-11 14:18:26

yes, i think that's right, but that as we are in london we prob need to move within .1 or .2 of a new school to have a chance of a place. Does seem like there's lots of movement but can't face too much more stress over this.

alittleteapot Mon 27-Jun-11 14:19:35

thanks everyone for replying. recommend anyone else who will need to move eventually does so as soon as they are pregnant! I'ts hellish trying to even think about it with two young children and I now understand why people describe moving as so fraught and stressful. It's not the moving it's the trying to move and all that goes with it!

mummytime Mon 27-Jun-11 14:47:45

I would suggest you think carefully, as the big time for moving is Secondary school. So unless you are convenient for a good secondary it might still be best to move now.

alittleteapot Mon 27-Jun-11 16:01:49

Thanks Mummytime, yes also as she is only four this month it seems like she's still young and adaptable and I would prefer a tricky patch this end of school life rather than later.

pantaloons Mon 27-Jun-11 16:06:08

We are moving house at the moment, but have had to rule out the area we wanted to live in as only one of my 3 children could get into the nearest school. All the local schools were hugely over subscribed and we were told they may all end up at different schools. We've decided to stay local to where we are already and luckily have found a house that suits us.

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