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Teachers or experienced parents: which is the best reading scheme to opt for in Reading Chest

(43 Posts)
zapostrophe Sun 12-Dec-10 20:28:18

Message withdrawn

reallytired Sun 12-Dec-10 20:30:58

Why don't you ask is teacher? Surely its the teacher who makes the decision when to move a child up a band.

Leave it to the experts.

zapostrophe Sun 12-Dec-10 20:40:12

Message withdrawn

littleducks Sun 12-Dec-10 20:43:56

I wouldnt opt for just one scheme, imo it limits the child, they get used to reading just one style

I would prob opt for all the phonic ones, once you have received books from all schemes you will prob both know which schemes are your favourite and which you really hate!

scrappydappydoo Sun 12-Dec-10 20:46:50

Do you get a choice then? We just get a new book every couple of days in the book bag - assigned by the teacher..

spanieleyes Sun 12-Dec-10 20:49:44

Reading Chest is a book rental service- a sort of do it yourself library!

crazygracieuk Sun 12-Dec-10 20:57:06

What does he get at school? I'd avoid that one so that you avoid him having to repeat books.

I'm not familiar with all the reading schemes but I'd opt for a phonics one.

RoadArt Sun 12-Dec-10 20:57:33

I loved Rigby Rocket books. There was fiction, non fiction and also linked to National Geographic (which were harder books for same colour levels).

Much more interesting than ORT and books to suit all the varied interests of kids.

For example, boys that like non fiction sometimes refuse to read fiction stories, so there was something for everyone.

nellieisstilltired Sun 12-Dec-10 21:01:00

can you link reading chest?
Is this as well as what the schools doing or are you home eding? I'm curious because I'm thinking of supplementing ds1 reading but not sure at the moment.

Fwiw, I find ORT and floppy's phonics tedious. Ds seems to struggle with these. He's had a set of rigby star, the stories seem much more interesting and he has really improved with them. So I would definitely include them.

reallytired Sun 12-Dec-10 21:01:06

I have to admit that I had never heard of reading chest before. What is the advantage over the library? Our local library has loads of lovely books suitable for early readers.

Reading is about comprehension as well as barking at print. It is more of a challenge to assess comprehension skills than the accuracy of decoding.

If it was me I would get books that were in the same band as recommended by the school. If you think your child needs to go up a band then mention it to the teacher.

As mothers its very easy to think your child is more able than they really are. Certainly I need bringing down to ground that my children aren't actually gifted and talented.

masochismTangoer Sun 12-Dec-10 21:54:21

littleducks:
I would prob opt for all the phonic ones, once you have received books from all schemes you will prob both know which schemes are your favourite and which you really hate!

This is what we did DD1 we did. Despite having lots different schemes it has been straightforward knowing when to move her up.

masochismTangoer Sun 12-Dec-10 21:55:47

nellieisstilltired:
can you link reading chest?
www.readingchest.co.uk/

masochismTangoer Sun 12-Dec-10 22:01:56

reallytired:
Our local library has loads of lovely books suitable for early readers

Lucky you for having access to a library like this.

reallytired
If it was me I would get books that were in the same band as recommended by the school. If you think your child needs to go up a band then mention it to the teacher.

Some times what they can do at home with the parents is more than they show they can do at school. Having said that we are usually on the same band level as school or a few weeks earlier than the schools changing levels. The OP is asking which book schemes to use - not really about when to change levels.

BrandyButterPie Sun 12-Dec-10 22:03:45

This is basically a privatised library then, only they choose the books for you?

Tbh, I can kind of see the appeal if you can't ever get to a library, or don't have the time to find out the names of books at each level. Not for me though I don't think.

zapostrophe Sun 12-Dec-10 22:06:26

Message withdrawn

nellieisstilltired Sun 12-Dec-10 22:15:27

Thank you masochismTangoer.
Ds has just started to get the hang of reading so I'm anxious he doesn't lose track over the holidays too.

onimolap Sun 12-Dec-10 22:18:49

IIRC, they also tell you the colour band of the books. I'd go for a mix of the schemes from his current level, following his interests.

DreamTeamGirl Sun 12-Dec-10 22:19:43

For a boy maybe Project X and Floppy's phonics if you want to start with 2.
Project X is meant to be fun for boys, and Floppy's phonics are fairly good

I might get 3 or 4 tho and then rule out what you and he dont really like.

BrandyButterPie Sun 12-Dec-10 22:38:48

You can order in any book to your local library though, often online and sometimes it is free for under 16s. You could order books over the phone years ago.

I'm rubbish at borrowing stuff from libraries/lovefilm etc anyway, so I can't really talk

I'd be interested if they provided some kid of added value like activities or whatever, but as it stands, I prefer reading eggs and some real books from the library or charity shop

blackeyedsusan Sun 12-Dec-10 23:35:29

Yes... libraries are great if you've got access, but our small section of early readers, contains red band books up to chapter books and the librarian I asked thought they were all pretty much the same level. hmm

reallytired Sun 12-Dec-10 23:36:31

We can order any book online within Hertfordshire libraries. Even if a local library is small you can access the catalogue online. Surely all areas of the UK have similar library provison. Certainly Surrey where I grew up does.

Our libraries are in danger with the coalition cut backs. If you don't use it you will lose it.

If you want a good reader you need to foster a love of reading and books. Reading scheme books are dull. Its much nicer to share proper books. You can let your child read a sentence or the odd word if they are early readers and gradually increase the proportion that they read. You can model sounding out and get them to read phonic words.

Most reading schemes are deathly dull. They are designed to assess skills and enjoyment is secondary. Learning to read should not be a race to get through the oxford reading tree.

BarbarianMum Mon 13-Dec-10 06:21:51

I favor the ORT and ds1 (5) favors Project X but he reads across several of the schemes you mention.

seeker Mon 13-Dec-10 06:28:45

Please don't. Just read loads of stories to him, go to the library, let him choose stories, go back oveer his "baby" picture books and see if he can read them himself (big thrill, this often is!). Look for words to read when you're out, make words out of number plates, write shopping lists - but please don;t do reading schemes at home.

Think of school and reading schemes as the driving lesson and home reading as the practice you do sitting next to your dad. The instructor tells you all the boring stuff about gears - then you go out and think "Wow - this is fantastic - look at me driving my car!!!!!"

Goblinchild Mon 13-Dec-10 07:34:04

Wise words seeker. smile

c0rnsillky Mon 13-Dec-10 08:03:21

yes agree with seeker
I'm coming across lots of children who can decode but with very weak vocabulary - work on that

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