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Help dd friend to embarrassed to talk to her mother about body changes, and is asking dd to ask me?

(4 Posts)
lexcat Mon 26-Sep-11 17:34:34

DD best friend end is worried about the puberty, saying she's to young (just turned 11) and she can't start till she's 13. I have always tried to be open about these things with dd and she has been trying to reassure her friend
(11) it's total normal. Add the fact that their is a small group of best friends and one girl has started her periods(the youngest just turned 10). It's lovely as they do talk to each other about puberty and their body changes, dd really likes as it makes it all seem more normal.

One of the group has got tender nipples and a slight discharge according to my dd. Today this friend told dd about her nipple discharge and asked dd to ask me if it was normal as she to embarrassed to tell her own mother.

ripstheirthroatoutliveupstairs Tue 27-Sep-11 10:19:50

Not sure what to suggest apart from visiting doctor. I don't think that nipple discharge is normal in one so young.
Why is the girl embarrassed to tell her own mum but willing to speak through a third party? I find that odd.
Do they get a 'talk' from school? I have no idea, DD is just 10.4 and recently started in the Uk at school. Sorry for my ignorance.

lexcat Tue 27-Sep-11 16:16:07

Dd has gone back to school and told friend that she really needs to talk too her own mother, which friend has said she will do.

Yes they had the 'talk from school' except friend (parents wishes for her not to be included.)

PrettyCandles Tue 27-Sep-11 16:24:31

Whenever any of my dcs' friends have asked me any questions of that sort, I have always answered in the same way as I would answer my own dc, but added that their parents know these things and that they can ask their own parents. I also tell the parent about the conversation.

My eldest is 11, so none of them have had any significant changes yet. But I don't see that I would do it any differently when they start puberty. Except, perhaps, telling the parent.

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