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Parents at nursery

(18 Posts)
GoodyGoodyGumdrops Tue 04-Apr-17 09:25:01

This is interesting. Certainly something I'd have gone for had it been available when mine were preschoolers.

What do people think?

Heirhelp Tue 04-Apr-17 09:28:08

What does it say? I am to lazy to watch a video as I would prefer to read articles.

GoodyGoodyGumdrops Tue 04-Apr-17 10:38:45

Yeah, me too, usually. grin

Fewer staff (therefore lower cost to parents) because parents work unpaid at nursery pro rata their child's attendance. So child has 5 days/week = parent 1 day par week. Child has less time at nursery = parent fewer days at nursery. Parents receive training, are overseen by trained staff, expected to muck in with all children and all jobs. Dads and mums involved.

Of course this wouldn't work for everybody.

WarwickDavisAsPlates Tue 04-Apr-17 11:37:25

But don't most people use nursery because they're at work don't they?

Sirzy Tue 04-Apr-17 11:41:48

Completely bonkers idea!

Too many parents - understandably - would be focused on their own child not the others.

I want my child being looked after by not only properly trained staff but people who are in the job because of a love of working with children not just to get cheaper rates.

If you have the time to spend a day a week in the nursery then surely you would have your child at home that day?

Who is paying for dbs? Training? Insurance?

Heirhelp Tue 04-Apr-17 11:48:41

^ what Sirzy said.

There would also be a lack of continuing of staff as parents keep changing.

This idea undervalues the role of skilled nursery staff by suggesting anyone can do it without proper training. Who would do their regular observation and give feedback?

Sirzy Tue 04-Apr-17 11:50:43

And also it could cause a lot of playground problems with parents gossiping and discussing things that really shouldn't be public knowledge.

Jemimapiddleduck Tue 04-Apr-17 11:52:33

Very similar to Playcentre here in NZ. Ends up being a fuck load of work and not that suited to those that are working outside the home. I do love it however as the kids have a blast and I discovered I really enjoy learning about child development

MrsDarkDestroyer Tue 04-Apr-17 12:00:45

Surely if your child is at nursery 5 days a week it's because you work full time?

ThouShallNotPass Tue 04-Apr-17 12:00:59

It's a terrible idea. As PP's have said,they possibly would focus on their own, or they may even be unkind towards children they perceived as bullies to their own. From my own experience, I internally struggle being attentive and friendly to a boy in my son's nursery who is a nasty little bully to most kids (no SN, just pandered to by his mum who is a teacher and therefore the nursery don't say a thing) He often leaves cuts, bruises and marks on my son and other children. Yet when I'm helping out with events I have to treat him like the rest. It is HARD.
I've a lot of experience working with kids but a parent who hasn't worked in child settings may not be able to handle it. Parents don't belong in nurseries except for events and occasions parents are invited in to participate.

GoodyGoodyGumdrops Tue 04-Apr-17 12:14:08

Like I said, it wouldn't work for everyone.

MiaowTheCat Tue 04-Apr-17 12:19:34

With some of the parents of this year's cohort I really really would not want them around my kid - they're the sort who would only give any attention or input to their own and their little clique's kids and would stand by and stare while another child not in their clique fell over and lay bleeding on the floor.

insancerre Tue 04-Apr-17 12:24:56

Terrible idea
Really bad
I don't even take volunteers at my nursery
If your only concern is with finance and not quality then fine

ThouShallNotPass Tue 04-Apr-17 12:36:57

@MiaowTheCat
I've seen a playgroup mum lift other's kids off ride on cars in order to give it to her child simply because their kid wanted the blue car instead of the identical red one they had. Another parent once watched her kid punch another (let's call him Bob) right in the gut because the Bob didn't let him snatch a toy off him. Upon realising that Bob wouldn't give up his toy (from home), even after a punch, he began to wail and the mother comforted him and said, "There there. What a mean boy Bob is!"
Hell no should she be in nursery in a position of trust!

GoodyGoodyGumdrops Tue 04-Apr-17 12:46:15

Maybe I'm different. I've never had any problem treating children fairly when volunteering at preschool or school. I've never been turned away, either.

TBH non of the volunteers I have seen or worked with at preschool or school have ever been as unpleasant as some of the non-staff adults at playgroups!

Perhaps they interview the parents to make sure that they are a good fit with the ethos of the nursery.

HSMMaCM Wed 05-Apr-17 08:48:01

Some parents would prefer to spend their valuable holiday days with their child on their own, rather than with lots of other children.

Some parents would be great help and love seeing their child 'at work', but many parents are simply not suited to childcare jobs, which can be hard work.

MiaowTheCat Wed 05-Apr-17 08:54:12

Unfortunately this year's cohort of parents are just not a particularly nice bunch. The previous years I'd have had no problems with them as a general rule (indeed a couple have gone on to work at preschool) but this year's bunch are just rude and cliquey beyond imagination.

Not that I'm counting the days till my youngest is out of there!

BackforGood Wed 05-Apr-17 20:29:33

Haven't clicked on the link, but, picking up from the discussion.....

When my dc were at Playgroup, all parents / carers were expected to be on the rota, and that was fine - you tend to take your dc to a playgroup if you are a SAHP, or on one of the days you aren't working. Surely you would be at work though if you are using a Nursery full time? So there wouldn't be people to do it.
Then it does rather suggest that 'anyone' can do a Nursery Nurse role and all their training is pointless, doesn't it?
That's before you get onto DBS checks - by the time the Nursery has paid for them, they aren't going to save much, if any, money.
Then there's lack of continuity for the more anxious children, and consistency for those with additional needs.

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