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unsure what to do near the end

(12 Posts)
BigBaboonBum Mon 30-Oct-17 11:30:04

Hi smile my partner works away most weeks in central London (we live up North), so the plan is to move into the appartment down there at about 7 months so if I go into labour he will be there.
The closest hospital is st Mary’s I believe, and they sound great for maternity... but how would I go about this? Would they allow me to do this if I change my details to the appartment etc for a few months?
I’d IDEALLY like to give birth up here but i can’t bear the thought of going into labour alone. It will also probably be a c section because it’s twins... which is my worst nightmare, but I also know if it’s needed then it’s needed (I haven’t been told anything yet, I’ve been googling about twins and making my own assumptions!) and anyway doing this alone would be horrible!

I’m not really sure what to do. If anybody has any input or suggestions then i would appreciate it!
Thank you flowers

KadabrasSpoon Mon 30-Oct-17 11:35:10

You'll need to book in again at your new hospital.
How many weeks are you now? Don't forget twins are usually delivered at 37 weeks and often come early so 7 months could be cutting it fine.

NapQueen Mon 30-Oct-17 11:39:18

Could you just stay up here? Presumably with twins it will be a planned induction or csec so he can make sure he us up here. Plus he can stay up here while he has his paternity leave?

BigBaboonBum Mon 30-Oct-17 11:41:50

I didn’t even think about that!
I’m only 11 weeks right now. I haven’t spoken to my midwife or anybody about it yet, we found out at a private scan a few days ago so I’m just depending on random Google results to answer my questions at the moment.
I can always go down earlier than 7 months though, I work from home so it isn’t a hassle to just work elsewhere. Do you think it’s a good idea to go down rather than stay up here? I’m just worried that if it’s during the night he wouldn’t be able to make it in time

BigBaboonBum Mon 30-Oct-17 11:47:35

@NapQueen it’s really difficult for him to take time off work, he is entitled to it but he’s a bit weird about taking time off (I have no idea). He also said he would prefer to once they’re here rather than beforehand.
I didn’t know they were planned though, is there a higher chance of them coming earlier?
I would absolutely rather stay up here if I was sure he would be here, because the thought of going back to his man cave appartment that looks like it’s straight out of an Ikea catalogue feels cold and unwelcoming... I want to be home ideally, but I would rather be there than without him during the birth

BigBaboonBum Mon 30-Oct-17 11:49:08

Off topic, random and silly question but can you stay awake during a c section? I know I sound silly but being asleep during the birth terrifies me

Waitingonasmile Mon 30-Oct-17 11:54:12

Most people are awake during a c section.

BigBaboonBum Mon 30-Oct-17 11:55:31

Thank you. My mum had a c section with me and told me she was asleep, although that was many moons ago

fishfingerSarnies Mon 30-Oct-17 11:58:26

I think you are better to stay at home and have him come to you he will just have to take time off when they come! It will likely be booked in at a certain date either induction or csection. And then even if they come early I’m sure he’d have time to get to you.
Do you have family/friends around up north?
Yes you are awake for a csection and they really aren’t that bad I quite enjoyed my elective section so try not to worry.
It’s early days you have plenty of time to talk things through with a midwife etc.

user1493413286 Mon 30-Oct-17 12:04:56

You can book to have your babies at the hospital you want to and then have your regular midwifery care where you live now. For a variety of reasons people often do that but you would need to have your scans at your birth hospital and any consultant appointments would be there.
Talk to your local midwife once you’re contacted for an appointment. I spoke to them about giving birth at a hospital in a neighbouring area and there were no issues, it was mainly about making sure my information was with the right hospital.

KadabrasSpoon Mon 30-Oct-17 12:05:18

Most women are awake during a c section. It can rarely turn into a general anaesthetic but only in a big emergency. By the way mine was a category 1 (biggest emergency level) and premature birth and I was still awake so they will only use GA if it's really necessary.
Yes multiples are more likely to be premature and 37 weeks is considered full term for twins.
I'd book in at a nearby hospital for now. You can always change later. It'll be easier for appointments to be where you are based currently rather than travelling. And see what your consultant advises.
Hospital wise you might want one with all the facilities just in case they are prem. It'll probably be fine but I've had friends that have found it difficult if a transfer to a different hospital is needed especially as you might be in a couple of nights if you're planning a c section, so you might find it better to have everything at one place.

But best thing to do is book in and ask the hospital. All the best

NapQueen Mon 30-Oct-17 12:05:43

Its a bit odd that he can be a bit funny about taking time off but would be on board with you having all this hassle of carrying and delivering twins in a town you dont want to be in because it is more convenient for him.

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