Talk

Advanced search

Anti D immunoglobulin

(17 Posts)
Shrimpie Wed 11-Oct-17 18:42:30

Hi smile does anyone know anything about anti d immunoglobulin? Thanks x

dementedpixie Wed 11-Oct-17 20:03:18

What do you want to know? I know I got in in pregnancy and after birth

Shrimpie Wed 11-Oct-17 20:08:19

I have been told I need to have it and not to worry. But I am a worrier unfortunately

dementedpixie Wed 11-Oct-17 20:14:47

What are you worried about? I gather you are rhesus negative?

BabyOrSanta Wed 11-Oct-17 20:17:28

In the simplest terms, it's an injection you have that stops your body fighting this or any future babies if they have a positive blood group.
Offered to all negative blood mothers to be smile

Roxx1516 Wed 11-Oct-17 20:17:31

I'm Rh negative, they give u anti D injection halfway through pregnancy and then again when baby is born, that's about it to be honest, I'm the worlds biggest worrier and I was fine with this injection it's nothing honestly

sakura06 Wed 11-Oct-17 20:20:07

It’s honestly nothing to worry about! It’s a bit of a sting as it’s a large needle, but that’s it.

redspottydress Wed 11-Oct-17 20:21:22

If your husband is also negative blood group you don't need it as you can't have a positive blood group baby.

halesie Wed 11-Oct-17 20:21:47

Another worrier here. It's fine smile

KERALA1 Wed 11-Oct-17 20:22:05

Something and nothing in the grand scheme of pregnancy and child rearing this isn't one to worry about

Bluerose27 Wed 11-Oct-17 20:25:56

It's one injection. Maybe 2 if you need another. As pp has said, if you and baby's father are both Rh negative then you don't need it. Get your partner to find out his blood type if he doesn't know it already

laelti Wed 11-Oct-17 21:05:04

Just to add - I'm rhesus negative, partner doesn't know his blood type.
Based on one of my blood tests done at 16 weeks (fetal dna I think?) was told baby has a negative blood type so I don't need the injections.
Even if you do I'm sure it'll be fine! Lots of Rhesus negative mums out there

LonginesPrime Wed 11-Oct-17 22:04:02

It's fine. They inject your butt and it stops the next baby you have from being rejected by your body. It's a no-brainer.

It's not like this is some new-fangled experimental procedure - it's been around for years now and makes being rhesus negative 'just one of those things' like having green eyes or an 'outie' belly button instead of it being absolutely devastating for you and your family, like it used to be before the anti-D injection.

SwishswishBiTCH Wed 11-Oct-17 22:16:52

Don't worry. It's just an injection that goes into your arm or bum at 28 weeks and after birth. It dosent hurt, judt stings a little bit. If you ever bleed between 12 weeks+ you must ring for the anti-D.

You're advised to have the anti-D in case the baby you are carrying has a positive rhesus status (RhD positive). This will mean there's a mismatch between your rhesus status and your baby's rhesus status. 

advertisement

During pregnancy and birth there are times when your baby's blood may mix with yours. This could happen as a result of a small bleed from the placenta. Even if there's no mixing of bloods during pregnancy, your blood and your baby's blood will almost certainly come into contact during birth. 

When your body detects your baby's blood within your circulation, it will treat it as a foreign invader. Your immune system will produce antibodies to destroy blood from your baby that it finds in your circulation. 

This means that your body will become sensitised to RhD-positive blood. Your antibodies won't harm your unborn baby. But, if you become pregnant again with another RhD-positive baby, the fact that your body is already sensitised could be a problem

BeeFarseer Wed 11-Oct-17 22:21:09

It's nothing to worry about. It's just a routine thing - which is amazing really. I'm also a worrier but once I learned a bit about it, I just marvelled at how wonderful medicine is.

MotherOfBeagles Wed 11-Oct-17 22:53:07

I’m rhesus negative and have had anti d twice during this pregnancy. Once as the standard and once because I had a bleed. As far as I understand it, it’s to prevent my body going into attack mode if any of the babies blood gets into my system (if they aren’t rhesus negative, if they are it won’t matter). My mum is also rhesus negative and carried three (large) healthy babies to term and we’re now all grown up. Honestly it is one thing I’ve not worried about!

Shrimpie Thu 12-Oct-17 08:47:42

Thank you. When I have spoken to people who have had babies all of them were positive so didn't actually no what I was talking about. smile

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now