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pregnancy and work

(31 Posts)
MuvaWifey77 Sat 28-Jan-17 19:40:34

Hi all, I'm 29 years old and have been working with a company for a year. I don't particularly love my job, as I think the bosses (2 men ) are very machists and create an unhealthy environment for all the girls, we are 5 therapists. I found out I was pregnant 4 weeks ago and I have no idea when I should tell them, I have worked for myself my entire life and this is my first time as employee. I wish to leave as soon as I can, but don't want to lose my maternity pay, I have to admit my main worry is boss making my life hell for being pregnant , I'm actually a bit scared of saying to them but I know that I have to do so legally.
Can someone explain to me how does the 52 weeks work? I want to leave and not come back but I don't want to lose any money.
Could I leave at 12 weeks ? Thanks x smile

Quarksoundslikequack Sat 28-Jan-17 19:47:09

Leave at 12 weeks of??

MuvaWifey77 Sat 28-Jan-17 19:48:32

12 weeks pregnant . Thanks x

Quarksoundslikequack Sat 28-Jan-17 19:48:39

Once you become entitled to mat leave I.E the pay & what not, you'll get it whether you work there or not.

Also, only the first 39 weeks are paid, rest is benefits or relying on others. X

AuntieStella Sat 28-Jan-17 19:50:49

This site is excellent:

www.maternityaction.org.uk

You cannot lose the statutory pay/allowance, but anything above that might be repayable depending on the policy of the organisation. You need to check if they already have a policy and what it says.

Quarksoundslikequack Sat 28-Jan-17 19:51:32

Ah, unfortunately to be entitled to mat pay, you'll need to work for the company earning a certain amount a week for a period of 8 weeks.

I fell pregnant on the 11th July, I told my employer on the 18th August simply because I went into hospital.
The period as to which I'd be entitled from would be the window between Sept-Dec, because I've passed that now I'm entitled to mat pay regardless of whether I leave now or not

MuvaWifey77 Sat 28-Jan-17 19:51:45

Sorry , that was very confusing. When does one gets entitle to mat. Leave? Thanks x

WinnieTheW0rm Sat 28-Jan-17 19:52:28

The earliest you can start (paid) maternity leave is 11 weeks before your estimated due date.

Backt0Black Sat 28-Jan-17 19:53:05

worksmart.org.uk/work-rights/family-friendly-work/maternity-leave/when-can-i-take-maternity-leave

The earliest that you can start your maternity leave is 11 weeks before your expected week of childbirth, which is when you are about 29 weeks pregnant. To ensure that you get all your rights, you should use the due date given on the MAT B1 pregnancy certificate that your midwife or GP will give you.

Backt0Black Sat 28-Jan-17 19:54:15

In short you cant really go on mat leave until you are about 29 weeks pregnant.

LemonyFresh Sat 28-Jan-17 19:54:26

The earliest you can take maternity leave is 11 weeks before your due date, so at 29 weeks.

Remember as soon as you tell your employer you're pregnant, you're protected so they can't discriminate against you. So it might be worth telling them sooner rather than later.

MuvaWifey77 Sat 28-Jan-17 19:55:55

Thanks so much girls. Very clarifying. What if I left before my paid mat. Leave , does that mean I will still receive its due? X

AuntieStella Sat 28-Jan-17 19:58:56

I'm not a girl.

No, if you resign with effect before maternity pay starts, you receive nothing.

FusionChefGeoff Sat 28-Jan-17 19:59:09

www.gov.uk/maternity-pay-leave/leave

You can start Mat leave from 11 weeks before due date - approx 29 weeks. You then get up to 52 weeks off but every company has different policies on how much you do or don't get paid. Everyone must pay, at least, statutory maternity pay which is 90% pay for 6 weeks and then £139.58 or 90% of your average weekly earnings (whichever is lower) for the next 33 weeks. After that you get no pay. They also can offer you a different job if you are off for more than 26 weeks - but they must offer you something the same in terms of money / hours / location.

LemonyFresh Sat 28-Jan-17 19:59:49

What reason would you want to leave before 29 weeks? Remember you have protection! Even if you're sick for weeks and weeks they can't do anything if it's pregnancy related.

MuvaWifey77 Sat 28-Jan-17 20:00:18

I'm just trying to understand if there is paid maternity leave And unpaid maternity leave. Then giving me the option not to see my bosses face up until I'm 29 weeks pregnant, even though I won't get paid.

AbbeyRoadCrossing Sat 28-Jan-17 20:04:07

Previous posters have already shared good links and advice.
I'd stick it out or you won't get any maternity pay at all if you quit.

MuvaWifey77 Sat 28-Jan-17 20:04:23

LemonyFreshy . it is a terrible enviroment , I work on my feet all day long, sit occasionally , but it's constant work and bosses are very machists , I have just been bullied into participate on the Whastapp group to be responding work related question 24/7 it is not something I want for my pregnancy... Xx

LemonyFresh Sat 28-Jan-17 20:05:03

The only alternative is quitting really, if you want your maternity pay stick it out until 29 weeks.

AnotherEmma Sat 28-Jan-17 20:05:14

Do you want to leave your job straight away or are you willing to wait until you go on maternity leave?

You are entitled to take a year of maternity leave, and as a PP said, you can start your maternity leave when you're 29 weeks pregnant or later.

If you keep your job for now, and stay there until you are 25 weeks pregnant or more, you will be entitled to SMP. You won't have to pay it back, even if you decide not to go back after maternity leave. SMP is set by the government and your employer can reclaim it.

If your employer offers an enhanced maternity package, i.e. more than SMP (unlikely based on what you've said about them!) the information should be in your employment contract and/or employee handbook. Often there are rules about paying it back if you don't return to work for a minimum specified time.

The rules say that you must tell your employer about your pregnancy before you're 25 weeks pregnant, but as a PP said, it's a good idea to tell them sooner, because it's against the law for them to dismiss or discriminate against you because of pregnancy. You are also entitled to paid time off to attend antenatal appointments.

It's up to you when you tell them, but I told my employer after my 12 week scan.

LemonyFresh Sat 28-Jan-17 20:06:49

I worked in the exact same environment - I was sick for quite a few weeks because it was so draining. I went on mat leave at 32 weeks.

Do you have any annual leave left? That would take you down to around 25 weeks

EdenX Sat 28-Jan-17 20:07:07

If you leave before your mat leave starts you may still be able to get maternity allowance from 29 weeks.

AnotherEmma Sat 28-Jan-17 20:10:05

Cross posts

"No, if you resign with effect before maternity pay starts, you receive nothing."

"I'd stick it out or you won't get any maternity pay at all if you quit."

This is not true.

The OP will be entitled to SMP as long as she keeps her job until she is 25 weeks pregnant, after that point she will have worked throughout the "qualifying period" so she will get it even if she quits her job.

If the OP leaves her job before she is 25 weeks pregnant, she won't get SMP but she will be entitled to Maternity Allowance instead.

See www.citizensadvice.org.uk/work/rights-at-work/parental-rights/maternity-pay-what-youre-entitled-to/

(Sorry to talk about you in the third person, OP!)

LemonyFresh Sat 28-Jan-17 20:10:23

You might qualify for maternity allowance? You'd have to check on the gov website, I'm
not 100% on eligibility

MuvaWifey77 Sat 28-Jan-17 20:10:50

AnotherEmma, thanks so much. You are very helpful. Thanks a lot. I might quit if i it find to stressful , otherwise I will stay until 25weeks and will be calling sick whenever I feel I can't cope. they won't be able to sack me.
Tks

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