Talk

Advanced search

Would you like to be a member of our research panel? Join here - there's (nearly) always a great incentive offered for your views.

Factor V Leiden

(4 Posts)
Colabottle10 Wed 13-Jan-16 11:57:24

Distracting myself from the sickness by filling in the forms given in the maternity pack from the GP.

I'm 8+1 and haven't seen a midwife yet.

Filling in the family medical history section. My mum died at age 51 of a Pulmonary Embolism caused by a DVT in her leg. My sister has Factor V Leiden, which is a blood clotting disorder. I didn't really know much about it so have been researching and it causes early miscarriage, clots in the umbilical cord and second and third trimester miscarriage!

I'm now totally panicking and have called the Community Midwives and left a message hoping someone will call back and I'll get a blood test done ASAP.

Does anyone have any experience of this? Should this have been picked up earlier in my pregnancy? GP has it on my notes but nothing has been said?

Pandora97 Wed 13-Jan-16 12:06:06

I'm assuming it's just your sister who has Factor V Leiden? I'd try not to worry about it too much although a blood test would be a good idea. The most likely thing they will do is refer you to a consultant and put you on enoxaparin (an injection every day to help prevent blood clots) throughout the pregnancy and possibly for 6 weeks post birth as well.

I hope the midwives get back to you soon but try not to panic. I wouldn't have expected this to be picked up any earlier with just a family history. It would be different if you actually had a blood clotting disorder yourself. smile

Colabottle10 Wed 13-Jan-16 12:11:23

I'm assuming my mum had it too, hence her early death. I should have been tested after she died when my sister was, but didn't have it done.

Trying not to google the horror stories.

mummyagainin2016 Wed 13-Jan-16 14:29:23

They may also advice low-dose aspirin. I'm on both for suspected low Protein S (another clotting disorder). Apparently aspirin protects the baby as it crossed the placenta and the enoxaparin (Clexane) protects you from clots.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now