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Glucose tolerance test

(21 Posts)
Youremindmeofthebabe Wed 14-Sep-11 10:52:40

I have an appointment for this in a few weeks time, but have just realised that I really don't want to do it, and don't know if I really need to. My pre-pg BMI was 21, I eat reasonably healthily and exercise a lot. I could also do with not needing to take the time off work (although that's by the by). To do, or not to do, is the questionsmile

pinkytheshrinky Wed 14-Sep-11 10:56:37

of course you do it - stop being silly

natwebb79 Wed 14-Sep-11 11:12:17

If they think you should have it then do it. I had it and it's no bother. Just make sure you take some mags and/or a good book for the hour breaks between Lucozade guzzling and the next test. Better safe than sorry.

Northernlurker Wed 14-Sep-11 11:20:21

The op is not being 'silly' hmm

Op - why is this test being recommended for you? Has the test been explained to you - also what happens if it is positive?

A glucose tolerance test is an investigation like any other. You should know why it's happening and you should be consenting to it not having it because 'they' say you should.

As far as time off goes though it's an antenatal appointment - you have a legal entitlement to paid time off for those I believe.

Crosshair Wed 14-Sep-11 11:22:40

I would go down the 'Better safe than sorry' route also. Did they explain why you should have it?

My pre-preg bmi was 20, very healthy diet, super fit, no history of diabetes in the family.

Had gestestional diabetes, was able to keep it under control with diet and so ds was unaffected, would have been a very dirfferent story if I had been unaware I had it.

Take the test, it's not even invasive.

natwebb79 Wed 14-Sep-11 11:30:42

The only reason I had to have it was becuase I was daft enough to mention that my grandad is diabetic (he's 90 years old and has only been diabetic for 2 years!). I just saw the test as a bonus - not everybody gets the reassurance or otherwise that their blood sugar levels are ok.

ExpensivePants Wed 14-Sep-11 11:32:03

I'm due to have it, but I know that there are reasons for that. I don't see why anyone would refuse this test though. It's not like a scan where you may decide you don't need to be forewarned of any issues. GD can seriously affect the health of your baby. It's not my favorite way to spend a morning but rather that than what the possible outcome could be.

Kitty5824 Wed 14-Sep-11 11:40:04

I've got mine tomorrow, but I have a high BMI so automatically fall into the high risk catagory. The only person I kow who developed gestational diabetes was underweight though....

My midwife discounted the diabetes that DH parent developed in their 70's but I guess I'd triggered the test anyway.....

I'm not concerned about the test, but agree the 2 hours of my life could be put to better use! Am scarily organised and am taking a book, a notebook to plan my Xmas shopping and my Xmas cards to write (EDD 21st December grin)

Youremindmeofthebabe Wed 14-Sep-11 11:54:38

lol at pinky. Cheers for that!

I asked my midwife if I should have it done, and she said vaguely that it was sometimes a good idea.hmm

I have no family history of diabetes. I have no sugar in my urine previously or when tested in this pg, my last baby weighed small at 41 weeks, around 6lb15, etc.

I do however have high-ish resting BP.

Thanks wildthings, that may sway me towards having it done.

kitty good idea! Perhaps I should do the same, due 5th Jan, and I know I won't be in the mood for shopping!

ToriaPumpkinPasty Wed 14-Sep-11 15:39:44

I've had THREE. Each has come back normal but my MW and consultant are desperate and determined to get me diagnosed with GD.

Agree that there are more pleasant ways to spend a morning but if it's being recommended it is usually for a reason. And I speak as someone who turned down the 16 week blood screening because I didn't see the point in another set of tests that wouldn't alter my opinion.

Northernlurker Wed 14-Sep-11 18:42:20

NICE guidance

Buggered if I can spot the 'risk' factor the OP should have for testing to be recommended for her. hmm

Youremindmeofthebabe Wed 14-Sep-11 20:39:43

That's brilliant northern thanks. Just the kind of info I need.

pruney1977 Wed 14-Sep-11 21:27:48

Kitty5824 we have the same due date smile I had my GTT last Friday, was thoroughly grumpy for the whole morning much to the chagrin of DH who had the day off. Felt exhausted, hungry and couldn't even nap in the afternoon because of the lucozade I had to drink (have not had any caffeine since got pregnant).

BarbaraWoodlouse Wed 14-Sep-11 21:35:00

I also had normal BMI, fit & healthy, no family history, no sugar in urine etc. I had GD and eventually had to use insulin. All was fine though smile

In my case I had the full GTT as our region tests everyone with a lucozade challenge at the 28 week bloods. I failed the challenge!

So whilst I agree with NortherLurker that you don't appear to have the risk factors if a GTT is the only way of testing you then I'd go for it. It's a few hours of your time vs potential harm to your baby if GD goes undetected.

hubbahubster Wed 14-Sep-11 21:39:09

You're not being silly. What a daft thing to say! None of these tests in pregnancy are compulsory, y'know, much as we're made to feel that they are.

I tested at 0.1 over the limit for GD in my area and basically had all of my birth choices denied as a result. This despite glucose testing for three months after meals and getting normal results every time without changing my diet one jot. Plus the limits set for GD across the country vary hugely - some set it at 7.8, others at 9. If you go with the GTT, be prepared to be very strong minded about what you want if it comes back with a GD diagnosis, since it opens up the possibility that your labour will be very medicalised. Good luck!

Northernlurker Wed 14-Sep-11 22:19:56

Hubba - that is exactly the problem with the GTT. Whilst it is clearly in a mother and a baby's best interests to have genuine glucose tolerance issues observed and addressed, there is also definately a knock on effect on birth choices - which in itself then impacts on wellbeing. Diabetic mothers are far more likely to be offered early induction - with potential for a cascade of intervention. Which is worrying when you consider the borderline results involved and the fact that as you said - once diagnosed you are diagnosed - your blood sugar levels can be fine and you will still be labelled as 'diabetic'.

hubbahubster Thu 15-Sep-11 08:56:52

That's it exactly Northern - my growth scan at 38 weeks showed baby was 80th centile and already 7lb 8. He wasn't even that big two weeks after he was born! He was delivered at 39 weeks weighing 6lb 13.

I agree it's really important to diagnose GD properly to keep mum and baby safe, but in borderline cases like mine the diabetic label can be frustrating and unhelpful. Next time I would go into it with my eyes open and stand up for myself (and my LO) a lot more.

It's difficult though, I was borderline (but my pg was 7 years ago) and I had to fight tooth and nail to deliver in a midwife led birth center, though I did get to do so, I'm not sure you would now.

However to not be diagnosed and run the risk of not even trying to control the condition with diet, could have very dangerous implications.

Flisspaps Thu 15-Sep-11 12:07:04

If you don't want to do it, then don't. All antenatal tests are offered and are not compulsory. If you feel that you do have risk factors as per Northernlurker's NICE Guidance link then it may be sensible to have it done, but at the same time, if you don't then why bother?

tinky19 Thu 15-Sep-11 12:23:16

Hi,
I had mine this morning (yuck, yuck, yuck)! I know my labour will be medicalised due to previous labour so already having to stamp my foot about one or two things. But, with a high bmi blush and diabetes in the family I thought it was worth doing. Having said that I was never even offered one last time (different area) and DS weoghed 7lbs but was 16 days late so actually on the smaller side. But things can change.
Good luck.

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