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Group B strep

(4 Posts)
mummyjah Tue 23-Aug-11 10:10:55

Have been searching for answers to the following but no luck so far. Does anyone know why, if GBS can cause premature labour (and PROM) antibiotics are not administered (or, any other sort of intervention) during pregnancy to try and prevent the PROM? Why are women left to continue pregnancy without intervention (not necessarily ABs - holistic perhaps?). What puzzles me is that if the link between GBS and PROM is strong then why do medics not mention trying to intervene/do something about it during pregnancy? All I've read about so far is that if you are a carrier (or colonised), then you'll have ABs in labour. What evidence is there that GBS causes premature labour, i.e., if any ladies feel sure that GBS caused their PROM/premature labour, then how do you know? Is it a 'feeling' or have you had a test to determine the link?

moregranny Tue 23-Aug-11 17:06:30

Have you looked at www.gbss.org.uk they have a helpline you can ring.

MeconiumHappens Tue 23-Aug-11 17:11:00

There is no reliable test for GBS, only picks up around 50% and can come and go during pregnancy. It would be near impossible to decide who and when to treat during pregnancy.
Occasionally it is picked up on vaginal swab and then you would be offered antibiotics in labour. Occasionally its picked up on baby swabs postnatally but again no treatment is given if baby is well.

ciwi Tue 23-Aug-11 17:27:23

I didn't think GBS caused PROM but the baby is at risk of infection if you have PROM already. My understanding about not treating it until labour is that you carry GBS so if they give you antibiotics it would get rid of it for a bit and then come back so they would have to treat you several times and you still might have it during labour. I have been told by a consultant obstetrician that GBS is only a potential problem to the baby once the waters have gone so that's when you need antibiotics.

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