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Has anyone else had their baby been diagnosed with talipes at the 20wk scan??

(6 Posts)
Flowerydems Fri 01-Jul-11 11:16:11

Just out of interest as it's just happened to me and I've got a consultant appt on Tuesday. Not sure what to make of it really so any experience anyone has would be great.

Thanks,

jenniec79 Fri 01-Jul-11 12:19:52

Don't get too het up about it yet.

Have a look for Ponsetti casting online (sure there's an NHS page, theres loads from the US)

Things to ask the consultant would be

-can they be sure this is true talipes on the scan from the images they have?One foot or both?
-who deals with these children in your area, one main centre or your local hospital?
-usually physiotherapy-delivered service with consultant around - is that what happens in your area?
-Can you speak to the ortho/physio team antenatally?
-Are there any other parents in the "system" already, who would be willing to talk to you about living with the casts/boots?
-will your baby get a routine hip scan too? (often worthwhile to rule out clicky hips etc.)

Most children do really well with casting, and it cuts down the amount of surgery needed dramatically - a boy born to one of Mum's antenatal-clinic-friends the same week as me had about 10 ops before school age, but nowadays most have none, or a tiny nick to the Achilles tendon under local! Even in boots&bars after the casting it really doesn't hold them back at all.

jenniec79 Fri 01-Jul-11 12:23:13

www.ponseti.info/v1/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=15&Itemid=29

Ponseti association website - loads of info, but this bit is the aimed at parents bit.

Fluter Fri 01-Jul-11 12:27:34

Yup. About three weeks ago. Would echo the post above - the talipes can range from 'sorts itself out' to needing the nick to the tendon. The orthopaedic consultant husband of a friend of mine said that it's incredibly routine these days. I was given an info sheet just after the scan about the way that the hospital deal with it, and the consultant said that if it was still there when the baby's born, they'd refer us to paediatrics.
We weren't too surprised - DH's brother had both feet in boots and irons when he was born 45+ years ago - and apparently it can be hereditary, and more common in boys (overall stats are apparently 1 in 1000).
Otherwise, I'm surprised that the sonographer didn't tell you straight away whether it was one or both feet (only one with us), as she'd kept going back during the scan to check it really was that, and not just T1 (I've got twins in there) holding its foot in a particular way. And she had to keep track of which one of four feet it was..... Also, if it's isolated (the only thing reported on the scan) then it's unlikely to indicate anything else.
Have a look at the Steps website for more info. smile

feckwit Fri 01-Jul-11 12:44:02

Not me but my brother was bron with severe talipes and is now in his 30s and you would never know. The only identifying marks with him are his scars and the fact his feet are slightly oddly shaped.

Flowerydems Fri 01-Jul-11 14:01:52

Thanks for the feedback.

Fluter - they did say it was bilateral (and quite obvious now I keep staring at the scan) but thankfully they don't think it's anything that won't be able to be fixed. Was a bit upset at first but if thats the extent of what's wrong then there's really nothing to worry about. She seemed to think baba had wriggled into a way of sitting and his bones had just gone into the position that his feet were in. Away to have a look at the website now smile

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