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Would it be really bad of me to rehome my cat?

(70 Posts)
Hopeysgirlwasntbig Thu 07-Aug-08 11:47:11

We have had her for 14 years. She isn't particularly affectionate, she comes in for food then goes out hunting for birds sad.

The past couple of years we have had increasing problems with her fouling inside the house, despite us buying a litter tray. We used to have a cat flap but she refused to use it, so we're often woken at 5am by her miaows to be let out.

We have to keep all the bedroom doors shut in case she fouls the carpets, she's 'christened' most of the rooms.

This morning DH came down to a nice turd on our cream rug in the lounge. Bless him, he cleaned it up and he's got a paralysed arm.

It is concerning me her pooing on the rug because my DD plays there, she's 10 months old.

Would it be bad of me to rehome her? Also how would I go about it?

beanieb Thu 07-Aug-08 11:48:26

Do it if you really want to but don't get another pet as they will get old too and then you will just have to go through the same thing again.

moondog Thu 07-Aug-08 11:48:45

Yes. Sosomeone else has to dealwith her. hmm

FioFio Thu 07-Aug-08 11:48:58

Message withdrawn

lilymolly Thu 07-Aug-08 11:55:40

have you had her checked out with a vet? she may have some incontinance issues.

Agree lock her in a room overnight

She is too old to rehome but you know that dont you ?

moondog Thu 07-Aug-08 11:56:56

Why use euphemism 'rehome'? Spit it out and say 'get rid'.

Hopeysgirlwasntbig Thu 07-Aug-08 12:03:18

hi Fio smile

So general consensus is she's too old to rehome. Not sure how long cats live for.

Can't lock her away because she miaows like mad.

Maybe I can get a kennel for outdoors for her, so she's not stuck out in the cold when the night's get colder.

Am genuinely worried about my DD playing where a cat has shat. Baby more important than cat.

lilymolly Thu 07-Aug-08 12:06:01

clean with anti bacterial spray.

its your responsability to look after her.
Take her to the vets and get her checked out please?

ChopsTheDuck Thu 07-Aug-08 12:09:00

she is a cat, and an old one at that! You cant stick her outside in a kennel, poor thing!

I agree, you need to get her checked out.

Hopeysgirlwasntbig Thu 07-Aug-08 12:12:10

ok, will get her checked. Have just been researching and it seems she's a pretty old cat, I thought they lived into there 20s! A friend once had a 20 something yr old cat.

bubblagirl Thu 07-Aug-08 12:25:34

17 is how old my cat was when she died and i wouldnt dream of getting rid of my cat to be honest over an incontinance issue poor thing she is elderly and unable to hold over night which i believe is natuaral for an old cat

take to vet get a once over and make sure no underlying issues and just try and maybe put old sheet down or paper to try and prevent if it happens

but i would not get rid how sad

kormachameleon Thu 07-Aug-08 12:30:12

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

kormachameleon Thu 07-Aug-08 12:31:47

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

bubblagirl Thu 07-Aug-08 12:34:21

most rescue places will put old cats down now due to not being able to re home and lack of space that would be sad for a cat that just has a poo problem and other than that mild mannered

deepinlaundry Thu 07-Aug-08 12:36:29

Would be kinder to have her put to sleep than re- homed.

MegBusset Thu 07-Aug-08 12:36:38

Agree much too old to rehome.

The pooing thing is very common in older cats. My beloved old mog used to do it. It can be down to stress -- have you tried one of those Feliway diffuser things? There could be other underlying health issues so do get her checked out.

Also clean the soiled area with biological washing liquid followed by antibac spray -- the enzymes in the washing liquid will break down any hidden smells that would draw her back to the same spots.

Make sure the litter tray is in a very quiet, private spot. Would agree that limiting her to a utility room at night would be a good thing. I think some cats are quite happy to be outdoors at night but would make sure she has access to shelter eg in a garage or garden shed.

newpup Thu 07-Aug-08 12:56:18

Firstly, get her checked out with a vet. Secondly, it seems a little harsh to rehome her now she is old and needs you. Keep her confined to a utility or kitchen at night if she is pooing inside. Although I appreciate it is unpleasant to clean up after her, it is very unkind to get rid of a pet because they need more attention.

She is not dangerous to you or your baby. I think you are just finding her inconvenient!

LazyLinePainterJane Thu 07-Aug-08 12:57:18

Have you taken her to a vet about the soiling? Surely you should do that before you even think about getting rid of her.

Qally Sun 10-Aug-08 13:52:54

Older animals often have incontinence issues, and they can be treated often as not (our Lab was, very successfully) so talk to the vet and see what they say. It may also be that the baby is causing her stress, especially if she's suddenly getting drastically less attention than before.

Talk to the RSPCA about foster homes. Some very dedicated people care for older animals who aren't suitable for adoption - I imagine you'd be happy to pay for insurance/vets and food? It'd be a bit much to expect a charity to arrange care and pick up the tab for an older animals' needs, and there's no way anyone would willingly take on an elderly animal with the problems you describe unless they were dedicated.

I agree the baby is more important than the cat, but if the mess is properly cleaned up after and the cat restricted to the kitchen overnight, there's no risk to your child. I also think it's a pretty rotten example to set a child - that living creatures are disposable, once they get old and difficult. I mean, part of parenting is setting the example we want kids to follow, no?

Also might be an idea to try putting the cat out overnight and letting her sleep indoors during the day; that way your sleep won't be affected but she'll get out as often as she needs to.

expatinscotland Sun 10-Aug-08 13:58:18

putting an old cat outdoors at night when she's not as able to defend herself is cruel, too.

really, if you can't take her to a vet and look after her properly you need to get rid of her - and i'm not going to say 'rehome' because i'm with moondog.

you should NOT get another pet until you are prepared to look after it until it dies.

pets get old, sick, make a mess, etc. if you're not prepared to deal with and want to put them out to pasture because of their issues, then don't get another one.

i find putting a healthy animal down shocking and cruel. i'm glad ot see more and more vets refusing to do this.

our cat lived to be about 15. we don't know because he came to us as a stray. he was a Persian and when his cancer got so bad he was no longer wanting to eat or drink we had him put down.

Qally Sun 10-Aug-08 15:48:32

expat, many vets don't refuse purely because it's perfectly legal for an owner to just bash their animal over the head instead, or drown them, and the vets figure a lethal injection is the lesser of two evils. Friend of mine had to put down a perfectly healthy 3 year old cat because the widowed owner was insisting it wanted to be with the dear departed. Nothing worked - friend even offered to adopt it herself, but no, the puss just wanted to be with the dead DH, it would be cruel to deny that. hmm My friend says the law needs to be altered so killing an animal yourself is a serious cruelty offence - if you can't find a professional willing to do it, you should have to rehome. She killed that cat because the mad old bat would have if she hadn't, and it still upsets her now, three years later.

Would you think overnighting is cruel in a country environment, if a cat is well enough to catch birds etc. still? Agree that a turf war situation in a town isn't, but a country cat should be okay, no?

Also want to chime in to agree that the "don't get a pet if you aren't able/willing to care for it's smelly, expensive old age needs." It's the only end possible if you're lucky enough to avoid a premature one, and an older animal is least equipped to handle change and rejection.

CarGirl Sun 10-Aug-08 15:53:36

If you have a relatively secure garden and provide her with a cosy warm garden kennel she should be fine. I would still feed her inside though and if she gets more feeble/elderly then she will have to come indoors.

It could partly be the stress of your dd arriving that has caused the problem or a physical problem that the vet can help with.

I honestly think cats and dogs (unless ill or hairless) are fine outside - that is why strays survive etc.

Minniethemoocher Sun 10-Aug-08 16:04:37

I took on a cat when he was 14, he belonged to an old lady that had died, and nobody else wanted to rehome such an old cat. He lived 10 more happy years with us, and died aged 24.

Pets are a lifetime commitment. The last few years he was stone deaf and had failing eye sight - but we kept him until he was diagnosed with cancer and his quality of life was too badly affected and he had to be put to sleep - I cried buckets!

So some people (like me!) will take on on older cat, but the animal shelters are full of older animals, because most people won't take the Golden Oldies.

BTW, DD has been raised with 2 elderly cats, with no bad effects on her health, so cats and babies are OK.

I would get her checked out by the vet for any physical problems, the soiling could alsow be a sign of stress.

I do think that it would be unkind to lock her outside....

expatinscotland Sun 10-Aug-08 17:44:11

'Would you think overnighting is cruel in a country environment, if a cat is well enough to catch birds etc. still? Agree that a turf war situation in a town isn't, but a country cat should be okay, no?'

No.

We live in the country and there are a number of wild non-feline predators that could easily take on an older cat.

The older cat also can't hunt as effectively and, ours at least, seems to need more sleep as she ages.

There are also quite a few dangers in the countryside, particularly traps and barbed wire fences.

I also adopted a 13-year-old cat whom no one wanted - there are a number of no-kill shelters in the US and animal cruelty is treated as a very serious because of the links it has with more serious crime against other vulnerable segments of society.

He lived a further 3 years with me before succumbing to cancer.

Neither DH nor I have ever adopted or taken in a stray that is a kitten because the need for homes for older cats is so great.

Poor things.

People just treat them like they're disposable when the going gets tought.

expatinscotland Sun 10-Aug-08 17:44:12

'Would you think overnighting is cruel in a country environment, if a cat is well enough to catch birds etc. still? Agree that a turf war situation in a town isn't, but a country cat should be okay, no?'

No.

We live in the country and there are a number of wild non-feline predators that could easily take on an older cat.

The older cat also can't hunt as effectively and, ours at least, seems to need more sleep as she ages.

There are also quite a few dangers in the countryside, particularly traps and barbed wire fences.

I also adopted a 13-year-old cat whom no one wanted - there are a number of no-kill shelters in the US and animal cruelty is treated as a very serious because of the links it has with more serious crime against other vulnerable segments of society.

He lived a further 3 years with me before succumbing to cancer.

Neither DH nor I have ever adopted or taken in a stray that is a kitten because the need for homes for older cats is so great.

Poor things.

People just treat them like they're disposable when the going gets tought.

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