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Practice/Practise..............how do you know which one to use????

(24 Posts)
FAQinglovely Tue 07-Apr-09 13:18:25

I apologise in advance for any grammatical errors in my post - I'm not a pedant and will never be one, I'm just not clever enough.

Just seen on another thread about stationery a tip to remember that it's e for envelope......

So is there an easy way to get practice/practise correct?????

Lilymaid Tue 07-Apr-09 13:20:06

Practice with a "C" is a noun
Practise with an "S" is a verb
(but not in the USA)
Perhaps someone has a jolly rhyme that explains

onegiantleap Tue 07-Apr-09 13:22:02

I always think of The Doctor's Practice, that helps me sort out the noun from the verb.

FAQinglovely Tue 07-Apr-09 13:22:30

ahh now you see I never learnt my noun/verbs/adverbs/etc at school - my lower and middle schools failed me dreadfully there. It's a mystery as to how I managed to get a 2 in my Standard Grade Latin - given that a basic knowledge of grammar is required blush

TrillianEAstraEgg Tue 07-Apr-09 13:23:15

It's the same as advice = noun
Advise = verb

Those two are easier to remember because they sound different.

smartiejake Tue 07-Apr-09 13:27:15

The Doctor's practice is in Harley street. (Noun- thing)
The doctor practises medicine in Harley street. (verb- doing word)

jura Tue 07-Apr-09 13:29:08

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

EasterEggsintheSky Tue 07-Apr-09 13:30:24

I always remember stationery/stationary because of the 'ar'/car thing. Just as complicated really!

lalalonglegs Tue 07-Apr-09 13:33:15

Because practice and practise pronounced the same (as are licence and license etc), it is easier to think of advice/advise to distinguish which is a noun and which is a verb.

FAQinglovely Tue 07-Apr-09 13:33:55

yeah but you have to know what verbs and nouns are to be able to distinguish them grin

lalalonglegs Tue 07-Apr-09 13:34:16

Oops, see Trillian got there first <<lala slopes off, feeling less clever>>

ellingwoman Tue 07-Apr-09 13:34:28

In the case of a doctor -

Practice is the place
Practise is what he does

TrillianEAstraEgg Tue 07-Apr-09 13:36:34

A verb is a doing word.

A noun is a thing (something that you can put 'the' in front of).

FAQinglovely Tue 07-Apr-09 13:38:19

<<<<FAQ's English lesson for the day>>>>>>

FAQ is sitting (verb) at the computer (noun) doing nothing grin

can you believe I got all the way through school, and got decent enough grades, and am now doing an OU course and I don't know about grammar shock blush

TrillianEAstraEgg Tue 07-Apr-09 13:42:43

I blame Maggie Thatcher. that pretty much gets you out of anything school-related smile

ellingwoman Tue 07-Apr-09 13:43:51

Aaaargh! Can't believe I posted a sexist comment after ranting on about equality todayblush

Correction :-

Practise is what she/he does

popsycal Tue 07-Apr-09 13:47:09

here is how I remember

alphabetical order

so practice and practise
noun and verb

practice goes with noun (both first in alphabet
practise goes with verb (both second in alphabet

Tobermory Tue 07-Apr-09 13:47:32

Im quite rubbish at remembering letter combinations in partic. words but have got practise/practice sorted

practice - 'ice' is a noun
practise - 'is' is a verb

popsycal Tue 07-Apr-09 13:48:03

A noun is a name ogf anything
as in chair or table, ball or string

A verb is an action word
As is run or ran, hear or heard

FAQinglovely Tue 07-Apr-09 13:49:11

oh TA I like that one and I am a Thatcher child (born in '79) grin

nct73 Fri 05-Jun-09 20:46:42

I use the Tobermory method. ice = noun

chocolateismyonlyweakness Fri 05-Jun-09 22:10:04

I wasn't taught grammar at school, and managed to get a degree in English Literature as a mature student - you're not alone, Faq!

I have also completed AS Level French this year and cobble the grammar together as I go along.

I went to school in the 70s when there was an idea that children absorbed how language fits together without having to teach the mechanics.

chocolateismyonlyweakness Fri 05-Jun-09 22:11:11

I wasn't taught grammar at school, and managed to get a degree in English Literature as a mature student - you're not alone, Faq!

I went to school in the 70s when there was an idea that children absorbed how language fits together without having to teach the mechanics.

chocolateismyonlyweakness Fri 05-Jun-09 22:11:59

Oops....blush

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