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AARRRGH AARRRRGH!! National Express trains have had me all lathered up in a frenzy!

(7 Posts)
theSuburbanDryad Wed 24-Sep-08 08:55:23

So coming back from Harwich yesterday I noticed that apparently, "National Express East Anglia is committed to providing a comfortable environment for all it's customers."

Couldn't help staring at it all the way to Colchester. I would have got out a pen and corrected it, but there was CCTV and I am a wimp.

Do you think I should write and complain? <<nothing better to do with time>>

AllFallDown Wed 24-Sep-08 11:06:40

Well, the use of "is" is correct. National Express is a single company. It takes a singular verb. "It's" is poor. Unless you misread it and it was really "its" in which case the whole sentence is unimpeachable in grammar, if not in truth.

MadameCastafiore Wed 24-Sep-08 11:07:28

Buy yourself a book and relax!

AllFallDown Wed 24-Sep-08 11:07:54

So your subject header should read: "National Express trains has had me all lathered up in a frenzy," Not "have".

theSuburbanDryad Wed 24-Sep-08 18:13:22

National Express East Anglia is not a single company, I don't think. It's part of the National Express group (which is possibly in itself part of a larger conglomerate) which incorporates the trains and coaches. (AFAIK)

It was definitely "it's". I got up and took a closer look, to make sure, at which the rest of the carriage tittered, I am sure. Wish I'd taken a picture now. blush

AllFallDown Wed 24-Sep-08 19:47:39

Yes, but National Express East Anglia is still one division, so it's a singular. It's is of course wrong. But is is correct. It is a single entity: the company as a whole is apologising, not all its employees. In UK English this rule of using a singular for organisations is broken only for groups we think of as agglomerations of individuals: in effect, sports teams ("Chelsea were beaten") and pop groups ("Girls Aloud were rubbish").

theSuburbanDryad Wed 24-Sep-08 20:34:04

I bow down to your superior pedantry, AFD. smile

<<runs out of Pedants' Corner with tail between legs>>

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