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Flaverings Sun 21-Apr-19 15:07:44

Off-load without interrupting the discussion elsewhere.

Flaverings Sun 21-Apr-19 15:09:15

Today I have read,

“Don’t want to be woah is me” which I quite liked and a comment about Buckingham Palace having to “reign in” the Duchess of Sussex which I thought was very apt.

DramaAlpaca Sun 21-Apr-19 15:16:06

The use of 'reign in' instead of 'rein in' is so common on here that I have to read it twice to convince myself it's wrong, if you see what I mean.

I love 'woah is me' grin

I've just spotted 'prolly' instead of 'probably' on a thread, which is what prompted me to post on here.

I've far better manners than to point it out on a thread, but it does make me cringe.

Flaverings Sun 21-Apr-19 16:03:29

I've far better manners than to point it out on a thread, but it does make me cringe.

I've often pondered over my pedantry. I think, for me, such mistakes are very distracting. In real life I find it takes me from the conversation in quite a jarring manner. Sometimes I find myself saying the correction out loud, and then promptly apologising for being so rude. It's not so much that I'm pointing out their error, so much as correcting for my peace of mind.

MikeUniformMike Tue 23-Apr-19 14:30:53

Asking mners to 'bare with me' is bear-faced cheek if you ask me.
Que for queue or cue irritates me as does the wrong use of cue and queue.
I've noticed that now that newspaper articles are spellchecked, word misuse is quite prevalent.
Calving knife, parking on the curb, palette/pallet/palate errors and so on.

Fifthtimelucky Tue 23-Apr-19 22:49:06

I've never seen 'calving knife'. It sounds very gruesome!

campion Thu 02-May-19 12:29:49

You need a restbite from your baby.

NottonightJosepheen Thu 02-May-19 12:38:21

You need a restbite from your baby

Some malapropisms are better than the actual word!grin

DirtyDennis Thu 02-May-19 12:41:28

"Less than" when the poster means "fewer than"
"Could of" rather than "could have"
Apostrophes in dates (e.g. "Back in the 1990's")

HollowTalk Thu 02-May-19 12:46:10

I think apostrophes in dates are acceptable if they are always used. I used to teach word processing and the exam board (who were red hot on other things) would accept either with or without, as long as the student was consistent.

YetAnotherSpartacus Thu 02-May-19 12:50:05

I thought that 'prolly' was an acceptable form of the vernacular or slang these days. I use it (knowingly) as such and in particular contexts. The one that irritates me is 'responce'.

NaturalBornWoman Thu 02-May-19 12:53:10

I've read about someone finding a situation gauling today grin

DirtyDennis Thu 02-May-19 13:27:13

@HollowTalk Interesting. I really, really hate apostrophes in dates grin

TheCanterburyWhales Thu 02-May-19 13:33:13

I find the absence of correct punctuation irritating.
Unlike the OP.

HollowTalk Thu 02-May-19 14:08:53

I don't use them either, DirtyDennis; I was just saying RSA/OCR found them acceptable.

UnaCorda Sat 04-May-19 15:35:00

Something being "exasperated" by something, instead of exacerbated. Can't remember the details. They don't even sound the same!

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