Talk

Advanced search

Passed or Past

(33 Posts)
MyPantsAreGreen Tue 19-Mar-19 20:41:59

My daughter loves designing notebook covers with slogans.

Which is correct?

"Follow your dreams past/passed mountains, past/passed deserts, past/passed rivers"

We've fallen out - I am thinking "passed" she says "past" !

PurpleDaisies Tue 19-Mar-19 20:44:10

Past

Soontobe60 Tue 19-Mar-19 20:44:45

She's right!
Passed is the past tense of pass.
Past can be in the past, or going past something

AtrociousCircumstance Tue 19-Mar-19 20:45:39

I passed a mountain on my way past an enormous dictionary.

AtrociousCircumstance Tue 19-Mar-19 20:45:48

So she’s right grin

tessiegirl Tue 19-Mar-19 20:46:23

Passed

Bigonesmallone3 Tue 19-Mar-19 20:46:40

I have just driven past the shops ✅
I have just driven passed the shop ❌

ColeHawlins Tue 19-Mar-19 20:47:14

Past.

tessiegirl Tue 19-Mar-19 20:48:27

Is she describing mountains in the past? Then could be 'past.
However if she us travelling past mountains it should be the verb 'to pass which would be 'passed'

64sNewName Tue 19-Mar-19 20:48:31

She is right. “Passed” is a verb. “Past” in the way you’d be using it here is a preposition.

“I passed a cake shop”

“I walked past a cake shop”

PurpleDaisies Tue 19-Mar-19 20:49:04

However if she us travelling past mountains it should be the verb 'to pass which would be 'passed'

This is incorrect.

ColeHawlins Tue 19-Mar-19 20:53:52

Is she describing mountains in the past? Then could be 'past.
However if she us travelling past mountains it should be the verb 'to pass which would be 'passed'

No @tessiegirl - "past" isn't only temporal.

"I walked past the newsagent on the way to the bank.", for example is correct usage.

So is "I passed the newsagent on the way to the bank."

64sNewName Tue 19-Mar-19 20:55:53

I think tessie does get it (she used “past” properly herself in her own post) - she’s just explained it a bit confusingly.

PurpleDaisies Tue 19-Mar-19 20:56:38

I think tessie does get it (she used “past” properly herself in her own post) - she’s just explained it a bit confusingly.

She doesn’t. She said to use “passed”.

ColeHawlins Tue 19-Mar-19 20:57:28

* I think tessie does get it (she used “past” properly herself in her own post) - she’s just explained it a bit confusingly.*

She used it correctly and then immediately gave the wrong answer grin

ColeHawlins Tue 19-Mar-19 20:59:04

OP's now reading this squabble with a face of confused

64sNewName Tue 19-Mar-19 21:01:30

I read it as her saying that you should use the verb “passed” to describe yourself travelling past mountains. And that is actually true! “I passed the mountain as I travelled north” etc.

But it isn’t what the OP’s daughter should be using, so it’s a confusing reply grin

PurpleDaisies Tue 19-Mar-19 21:02:27

64 earlier in the thread she says passed as the answer.

MyPantsAreGreen Tue 19-Mar-19 21:03:15

I am thinking, "Follow your dreams (is present tense) so there are two alternatives.

Follow your dreams walking past mountains etc

Follow your dreams passing mountains etc

I think past on its own isn't right as there is no verb for the movement included and actually I was wrong too because "passed" would be the past tense!

So confusing!!

64sNewName Tue 19-Mar-19 21:04:13

Ah, I missed her earlier post! Sorry all.

OP, I hope somehow you can make sense of all this.

mamma2016 Tue 19-Mar-19 21:04:52

Follow is the verb in her sentence. She's using 'past' as a preposition. I think she's correct.

PurpleDaisies Tue 19-Mar-19 21:05:53

I think past on its own isn't right as there is no verb for the movement included

Follow is the verb

64sNewName Tue 19-Mar-19 21:07:47

Honestly, OP, “past” is perfectly correct in the first example slogan you gave.

Not sure what you mean by no verb? “Follow” is the verb.

PurpleDaisies Tue 19-Mar-19 21:44:18

Are you going to admit your error to your daughter op?

Danglingmod Tue 19-Mar-19 22:17:00

Yep, your daughter is right.

As others said, follow is the verb and past is a preposition... Replace past with below, around, under, beyond, above... (OK, not perfect semantic sense but all grammatically correct)... They're prepositions.

Join the discussion

Registering is free, quick, and means you can join in the discussion, watch threads, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Get started »