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Haitch

(113 Posts)
Polidori Thu 25-May-17 17:50:27

I seem to hear this more and more. There's no such word as haitch. The eighth letter of the alphabet is called 'aitch'. It's not a question of region or opinion, it's just wrong. Aitch is in dictionaries. Haitch isn't.

NotYoda Thu 25-May-17 17:52:09

Well, bang goes any discussion then grin

Polidori Thu 25-May-17 17:53:26

I'm quite certain nobody here is too shy to say so if they disagree with me!

BelleTheSheepdog Thu 25-May-17 17:53:27

It is haitch in Ireland and there is some historical justification for it (monks in Middle Ages maybe?)

I read this on the internet (!) but the details have sadly dropped out of my aged memory.

Polidori Thu 25-May-17 17:57:37

Do English dictionaries in Ireland spell it that way?

BelleTheSheepdog Thu 25-May-17 17:58:58

I don't know.

You could Google it.

Partyfops Thu 25-May-17 18:02:22

DH and I always argue over this, I'm afraid that I am used to saying haitch and just don't see that I am hurting anyone with it ( although DD now says it!)

LivLemler Thu 25-May-17 18:05:57

As a PP has said, it's haitch in Ireland. Not to mention many regions of Britain and I'm guessing a good chunk of the English speaking world.

LivLemler Thu 25-May-17 18:05:58

As a PP has said, it's haitch in Ireland. Not to mention many regions of Britain and I'm guessing a good chunk of the English speaking world.

Polidori Thu 25-May-17 18:07:09

It is not haitch in Ireland any more than it is haitch in England. A lot of people in Ireland pronounce it haitch. A lot of people in England pronounce it haitch. It is a common mistake in both countries.

LivLemler Thu 25-May-17 18:09:46

No. Hibernian English is a recognised dialect. We say haitch. I'm no linguist but there have been plenty of threads on this before. They'll be easily found via advanced search I'm sure.

BelleTheSheepdog Thu 25-May-17 18:10:20

I think we may as well end the thread now.

Polidori Thu 25-May-17 18:12:04

Recognised by whom?

allegretto Thu 25-May-17 18:20:04

It's not a mistake, it's a regional variation. Why do you think there is only one way of pronouncing things?

Polidori Thu 25-May-17 18:22:16

(a) It isn't regional. People make this error everywhere.
(b) I don't think there is only one way of pronouncing things.

flibberdee Thu 25-May-17 18:23:37

I agree. It's Aitch.

Polidori Thu 25-May-17 18:25:12

Thank you!

mineallmine Thu 25-May-17 18:25:34

For most English speakers, the name for the letter is pronounced as /ˈeɪtʃ/ and spelled 'aitch'[1] or occasionally 'eitch'. The pronunciation /ˈheɪtʃ/ and the associated spelling 'haitch' is often considered to be h-adding and is considered nonstandard in England.[2] It is, however, a feature of Hiberno-English[3] and other varieties of English, such as those of Malaysia, India, Newfoundland, and Singapore.[citation needed] In Northern Ireland, it is a shibboleth as Protestant schools teach aitch and Catholics haitch.[citation needed] In the Republic of Ireland, the letter h is generally pronounced as "haitch".

The perceived name of the letter affects the choice of indefinite article before initialisms beginning with H: for example "an H-bomb" or "a H-bomb". The pronunciation /ˈheɪtʃ/ may be a hypercorrection formed by analogy with the names of the other letters of the alphabet, most of which include the sound they represent.[4]

The haitch pronunciation of h has spread in England, being used by approximately 24% of English people born since 1982[5] and polls continue to show this pronunciation becoming more common among younger native speakers. Despite this increasing number, pronunciation without the /h/ sound is still considered to be standard in England, although the pronunciation with /h/ is also attested as a legitimate variant.[2]

Polidori Thu 25-May-17 18:27:44

That massive cut and paste job is agreeing with me. The haitch pronunciation is widespread and increasing.
That doesn't make it right.

SavoyCabbage Thu 25-May-17 18:30:22

There is a teacher in my dd's school called Mr H and its pronounced haitch so I can't even stop dd from saying it!

mineallmine Thu 25-May-17 18:32:23

It is, however, a feature of Hiberno-English[3] and other varieties of English, such as those of Malaysia, India, Newfoundland, and Singapore.[citation needed] In Northern Ireland, it is a shibboleth as Protestant schools teach aitch and Catholics haitch.[citation needed] In the Republic of Ireland, the letter h is generally pronounced as "haitch".

More cutting and pasting but I'm too tired to type. I can be a right pedant myself but downing your gavel and insisting that everyone in Ireland is wrong in pronouncing it haitch is just annoying. You're not right about this, no matter what you think.

Polidori Thu 25-May-17 18:34:47

"Generally pronounced" doesn't make it a real word. Look in a dictionary. Aitch is a word. Haitch isn't.
Loads of people say 'should of' too. Being widespread doesn't make it right.

allegretto Thu 25-May-17 18:34:50

That doesn't make it right.

What does make it right? Because you seem to be suggesting that you decide. grin

Polidori Thu 25-May-17 18:36:00

I'm suggesting no such thing. I've referred to the dictionary several times.

allegretto Thu 25-May-17 18:37:50

The dictionary is always behind current usage. It will catch up!

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