'DD1 & DD2's bedroom' or 'DD1 & DD2s' bedroom'?

(13 Posts)
Readytomakechanges Mon 17-Oct-16 13:45:15

Please can anyone help me place the apostrophe correctly in the name plaque that we are making for the bedroom door of DDs 1 & 2?

Thank you.

AlbusPercival Mon 17-Oct-16 13:47:38

Let's assume they are called Katie and Emma

It would be Katie and Emma's bedroom

FlopIsMyParentingGuru Mon 17-Oct-16 13:47:52

The first. Because there's only one bedroom.

I think

Readytomakechanges Mon 17-Oct-16 13:51:02

Thank you.

PassTheCremeEggs Mon 17-Oct-16 13:52:50

It's the first, but not because there's only one bedroom. The apostrophe refers to how many owners there are, not how many items being owned.

It would still be Katie and Emma's toys, for example.

DadDadDad Mon 17-Oct-16 22:55:35

I think Katie's and Emma's room is clearer, and more symmetrical.

That way, these sentences have different meanings:

In the sitting room, you'll find Katie and Emma's toys. (K is in the sitting room, toys belonging to E are in the sitting room)

In the sitting room, you'll find Katie's and Emma's toys. (Toys belonging to K and to E are in the sitting room).

ThenLaterWhenItGotDark Thu 20-Oct-16 15:42:35

You only need an apostrophe on the second name. If you put one on the first as well, it means there are two different rooms.

DadDadDad Thu 20-Oct-16 19:55:53

No, it doesn't. To my ear, Katie's and Emma's room definitely means one room belonging to both.

EvilTwins Thu 20-Oct-16 19:59:13

My DDs shared a room for years. Their door plaque just said Katie & Emma (but their names, obviously)

ThenLaterWhenItGotDark Fri 21-Oct-16 08:39:42

www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/grammar/learnit/learnitv57.shtml

ThenLaterWhenItGotDark Fri 21-Oct-16 08:41:53

Rule 4b explains it clearly

www.grammarbook.com/punctuation/apostro.asp

RiverTam Fri 21-Oct-16 08:47:11

If there were two different rooms then rooms would be in the plural. Katie's and Emma's rooms.

DadDadDad Fri 21-Oct-16 08:55:28

Exactly, River, rule 4b in TLIGD's gives an example where the object being possessed is plural. If room is singular it must refer to one room, and whether you put 's on the first name is a matter of style and clarity not grammar.

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