Talk

Advanced search

Baby rice

(55 Posts)
5678hfdtu Sun 01-Nov-20 18:13:43

Why are so many people against it? What are the pros and cons?
I'm weaning my lo and have some ellas kitchen banana baby rice which he has from time to time and absolutely loves but have seen a lot of people saying bad things

OP’s posts: |
Letsallscreamatthesistene Sun 01-Nov-20 19:34:00

I think theres just very little nutrients in it in comparison with alternatives. Theres nothing wrong with, you could just give better stuff.

5678hfdtu Sun 01-Nov-20 20:06:50

Please tell me if I'm being very stupid but doesn't the milk (formula or breast milk) you make it with provide the nutrition? And the rice serves as the 'cereal' part of the diet babies should have?

OP’s posts: |
5678hfdtu Sun 01-Nov-20 20:08:45

For example, in the ellas kitchen baby rice, quinoa is the main ingredient which is very high in protein, fibre and iron

OP’s posts: |
YoureRight Mon 02-Nov-20 12:54:07

It has no pros, it’s a throwback to when people used to wean their infants dangerously early before their gut was ready and would spoon slop into the kids mouths as they pushed it back out with their tongues.
Once they’re 6 months, just give them normal food.

GrumpyHoonMain Mon 02-Nov-20 13:09:00

I personally dislike rice in general because of the arsenic content. Prefer oats for babies.

Abouttimemum Mon 02-Nov-20 14:10:19

There’s just better options really, like oats and fresh vegetables.

5678hfdtu Mon 02-Nov-20 15:42:28

NHS say on their website the arsenic content can't cause any harm. Fair enough, the quinoa based baby rice I'm giving is great for iron which they need as they don't get a lot from formula smile

OP’s posts: |
attillathenun Mon 02-Nov-20 16:02:28

It’s literally just rice powder and flavouring and that’s it, yes it might be fortified with vitamins but it just doesn’t have anything else going for it!! As previous poster has said, it would be better to go for porridge oats (even readybrek if you want a smooth texture!) or veg purées. Plus it’s expensive compared to normal food!

Letsallscreamatthesistene Mon 02-Nov-20 16:10:43

OP if you want to carry giving it, then carry on

Augustbaby1990 Mon 02-Nov-20 16:11:21

Have a taste when you next make it. I brought this and tasted it before feeding DS. I changed my mind as soon as I tasted it and gave him fruit instead

serialreturner Mon 02-Nov-20 16:16:02

YoureRight

It has no pros, it’s a throwback to when people used to wean their infants dangerously early before their gut was ready and would spoon slop into the kids mouths as they pushed it back out with their tongues.
Once they’re 6 months, just give them normal food.

The above.

It's basically dust.

PeanutButterFalcon Mon 02-Nov-20 16:23:44

5678hfdtu

NHS say on their website the arsenic content can't cause any harm. Fair enough, the quinoa based baby rice I'm giving is great for iron which they need as they don't get a lot from formula smile


I was reading on the NHS website last night that they do not recommend baby rice due to the arsenic content

GrumpyHoonMain Mon 02-Nov-20 18:00:10

@ PeanutButterFalcon - you’re right. They don’t recommend rice cakes either

5678hfdtu Mon 02-Nov-20 19:04:46

We recommend that consumers eat a balanced, varied and healthy diet. Rice and rice products can be part of that, including for young children.
"However, we do advise that toddlers and young children – ages 1-4.5 – should not be given rice drinks as a substitute for breast milk, infant formula or cow's milk.
"This is because of their proportionally higher milk consumption and lower body weight compared to other consumers." 

Continued exposure to high levels of inorganic arsenic is known to have toxic effects, possibly increasing the risk of cancer and affecting development. However, this study doesn't give evidence that the arsenic levels in urine observed here would be toxic to the child and could affect their future health.

Erm where exactly? This is from the NHS website

OP’s posts: |
5678hfdtu Mon 02-Nov-20 19:06:52

'Europe set a limit on the amount of arsenic that should be present in rice products in January 2016.'

Also this

OP’s posts: |
MummaBear4321 Mon 02-Nov-20 19:12:37

OP the PPs have given you their opinions considering you asked why people are against it, and for the pros and cons. There are very little pros to baby rice compared to giving a baby pureed fresh vegetables. Baby rice doesnt hold anything pureed broccoli or pureed carrot wouldnt, and considering baby would still be having bottles of formula, baby wouldnt be missing out on anything.

Why ask for peoples opinions if you are just going to refute them anyway?

june2007 Mon 02-Nov-20 19:18:48

I used a bit with my first but not my second, there isn,t much nutrients in it, the feal or Arsnic, it,s a bit pointless.

5678hfdtu Mon 02-Nov-20 19:42:59

MummaBear4321

OP the PPs have given you their opinions considering you asked why people are against it, and for the pros and cons. There are very little pros to baby rice compared to giving a baby pureed fresh vegetables. Baby rice doesnt hold anything pureed broccoli or pureed carrot wouldnt, and considering baby would still be having bottles of formula, baby wouldnt be missing out on anything.

Why ask for peoples opinions if you are just going to refute them anyway?


Where did I refuse the opinions? Just having a conversation. And I'm pointing out I found conflicting information to what people are telling me is all. Sorry for replying :/

OP’s posts: |
Ohalrightthen Mon 02-Nov-20 20:02:08

If he enjoys the flavour, why not just give him bits of banana? Much better for him, nutritionally and developmentally!

AnneLovesGilbert Mon 02-Nov-20 20:33:38

Why are you giving him that instead of normal homemade porridge with oats (whizz in the blender before you cook it if you want it smoother) and full fat milk? So much cheaper, healthier, mix in some mashed banana if you want to. Oats are full of goodness and as he grows you can use the oats unwhizzed so he gets used to different textures.

What else are you giving him? Things like cucumber sticks, celery, steamed broccoli, carrots or courgettes etc are great, bits of bread, full fat plain yogurt. They get to use their hands and try different textures and flavours. You don’t want to fill them up with chaff, you want them to experience a wide range of foods, it’s not about eating but the whole thing. And we’re all programmed to enjoy sweet flavours so it’s good to get them on savoury things asap.

5678hfdtu Mon 02-Nov-20 20:38:43

He has it every few days if he wants more food than Ive made. He's had every vegetable under the sun and tries new things every day! Just wanted to check there was nothing seriously wrong with it but I guess not

OP’s posts: |
Ohalrightthen Mon 02-Nov-20 20:43:15

There's nothing "seriously wrong", it's not like McDonald's or anything, but it's just dust and flavouring really, it's basically nothing. It's not going to hurt him, but there are so many better things you could give him so I'd wonder why you'd bother really.

PeanutButterFalcon Mon 02-Nov-20 20:58:39

5678hfdtu

We recommend that consumers eat a balanced, varied and healthy diet. Rice and rice products can be part of that, including for young children.
"However, we do advise that toddlers and young children – ages 1-4.5 – should not be given rice drinks as a substitute for breast milk, infant formula or cow's milk.
"This is because of their proportionally higher milk consumption and lower body weight compared to other consumers." 

Continued exposure to high levels of inorganic arsenic is known to have toxic effects, possibly increasing the risk of cancer and affecting development. However, this study doesn't give evidence that the arsenic levels in urine observed here would be toxic to the child and could affect their future health.

Erm where exactly? This is from the NHS website


And the rest of the site says "baby's do not need baby rice".
It is also under the foods to avoid section and also states

Don't worry if your child has already had rice drinks. There's no immediate risk to them, but it's best to switch to a different kind of milk.

Personally after reading the entire weaning section I wouldn't want to risk poisoning my child for little health benefits you can achieve with other foods but that doesn't mean you have to. Each to their own but I was just pointing out the NHS doesn't recommend it

PeanutButterFalcon Mon 02-Nov-20 20:59:46

To add I assumed as you said weaning it was a baby not a toddler as mentioned in your post

Join the discussion

To comment on this thread you need to create a Mumsnet account.

Join Mumsnet

Already have a Mumsnet account? Log in