When your DC is good at something which they don't want to do...

(8 Posts)
rookiemere Wed 31-Aug-16 18:56:43

Gah so DS,10 is at a school where rugby is high on the agenda. He used to play outside of school at the weekends.

He is good at it and today they had tryouts for school. He got into the top squad, but doesn't want to do it as he much prefers football where he is distinctly average and they impressed on them how important it was to be there for every Saturday rugby match and they shouted at them at training.

So we've said fine, he doesn't have to, but inside I'm disappointed. I'd love to be good at a sport, I guess he's less likely to get injured playing football than rugby, but it's a big thing at the school and he's such a natural at it.

I did the right thing didn't I - not forcing him to do something he doesn't enjoy?

Mrscog Wed 31-Aug-16 19:45:16

Definitely, and maybe he'll improve at football if he gets to play more. At least he's interested in doing a sport.

GettingScaredNow Wed 31-Aug-16 19:47:28

Ahhhh, yes you did the right thing, but I 100% get where your coming from.
I will likely feel the same when my 2 are older!

NancyJoan Wed 31-Aug-16 19:48:09

You definitely did the right thing. I get why you feel disappointed. But it's got to be his thing, not yours. And nothing is so likely to kill off an enjoyment of sport as being forced to play a game you hate.

ineedamoreadultieradult Wed 31-Aug-16 19:51:17

It's OK to feel a bit disappointed inside but you are right to let him do what he enjoys rather than what he is good at. DS9 is an excellent swimmer he didn't want to progress, he didn't want to train at 6am and he isn't very competitive. Instead he is using his swimming buy going to Lifeguard training which he loves. It was nice to see him do well at swimming it is nicer to see him looking forward to training and coming out with a huge smile on his face.

GastonsPomPomWrath Wed 31-Aug-16 20:00:20

Yes, you did the right thing. My dd was doing ballet for 2 years. It was a lovely school, very relaxed way of teaching, no pressure. I paid for the exams etc and afterwards the adjudicator called us back in to say she was destined for great things and that she was something truly extra special.

One day, she simply refused to go. Cried. Sat on the floor and wouldn't move. We didn't make her obviously. It stopped dead that day and she never went back. We've asked her why she suddenly didn't want to and she shrugs and says she doesn't know. She's always been a bit...lazy. Very clever but can't be bothered to apply herself and it's been the same with any hobbies she's tried. She'll have a go but finds it too much like hard work after a short time.

I know where you're coming from with the disappointment. It's hard. You know they could be great but wish they knew it too!

rookiemere Wed 31-Aug-16 20:58:26

Thanks guys.
Am slightly relieved now as there has been a mix up in cub and scouts so he has to do both next week which would have just been too much with rugby training as well.

Mycraneisfixed Wed 31-Aug-16 21:17:27

You did the right thing. My DC are all grown up now but they chose what sport or activity to drop or keep up. I encouraged but didn't insist and the choice was theirs.

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