Talk

Advanced search

What's for lunch today? Take inspiration from Mumsnetters' tried-and-tested recipes in our Top Bananas! cookbook - now under £10

Find out more

The kids want a drum kit....

(20 Posts)
snorkle Wed 17-May-06 22:52:55

Message withdrawn

kid Wed 17-May-06 22:54:08

We got DS a drum kit for his 2nd birthday. He absolutely loved it but it only lasted a few months before he broke it!

supakids Wed 17-May-06 22:56:26

What about the neighbours, you do want to stay friendly with them eh?

snorkle Wed 17-May-06 23:00:26

Message withdrawn

Skribble Wed 17-May-06 23:15:22

Only if you have a hut at the bottom of the garden to put them, sreiously only if they are going to get proper lessons and not just crash about on them.

annh Wed 17-May-06 23:24:41

DS1 (7)really wanted a drum kit for Christmas and as he had already played around with the cheapo digital toy version we knew that he meant the real thing so we compromised and hired a set for 6 months from the local music store which has a music school attached. That might be worth considering before commiting to the full cost. In our case, if you decide to purchase after 6 months, they refund the full hire fee against the purchase price. He also has a half-hour lesson once a week (I think it works out at 11 pounds a lesson)and he really loves it. The lesson provides him with some structure but we also have a learning CD at home which he plays along with or he just messes about sometimes. Re the neighbours, we are detached although don't live any great distance from next door but we only let him practice up to about 6.30 in the evening and nobody has ever commented. Mind you, that's easier with a 7-yr old who goes to bed at 7.30, than a 12 year old who is presumably up later!

pablopatito Thu 18-May-06 08:57:09

What about electronic drums, that way you can control the volume or use headphones. And I believe they can be pretty good (though expensive I guess)

snorkle Thu 18-May-06 09:23:29

Message withdrawn

pablopatito Thu 18-May-06 09:42:51

Tssh. If electronic drums are good enough for the great Stephen Morris in New Order they should be good enough for anyone! Oh well.

moyasmum Thu 18-May-06 09:45:46

My dd1 got a full set when she was 8 and lessons through the local music shop. After a few months it gradually dawned that she wasnt getting much from it. We left the lessons for a few months then restarted still not great improvement and didnt practice. My point is we've had a bloody big drum kit cluttering up the house for 4 years now but she doesnt want to get rid. I only wished she showed interest in something a lot smaller!
Hiring sounds like a great idea if possible, or can you link up with someone locally (older school mate maybe),for the first few months.

Gem13 Thu 18-May-06 09:47:20

DN(nephew) got an electronic drum kit for his birthday as recommended by his drum teacher. DBro bought them on ebay for about £500. They seem great - excellent sound plus he can plug in his headphones and no one can hear him! He's 11 and really enjoys playing the drum bit to special rock cds which have the drum bit missing.

noddyholder Thu 18-May-06 09:48:57

My dp is a drummer.We have drums and they are extremely noisy.The new electronic drums are brilliant they are like real drums but cost about 1000 minimum.They6 are nothing like the old drum pads which have an electronic-y sound and they look like a kit.They are called Roland v drums.Having said that if you only practice at certain times the neighbours should be ok and you can get rubber practice pads.Why don't you send him to a few lessons as drums is one of those things that people think are really easy and they often give up when they realise it is quite a skill.My dp advises his pupils parents not to buy a kit and to let them practice rudiments with sticks and a rubber pad on a pillow.If they show real interest and/or talent then buy a kit HTH

noddyholder Thu 18-May-06 09:49:45

My dp is a drummer.We have drums and they are extremely noisy.The new electronic drums are brilliant they are like real drums but cost about 1000 minimum.They6 are nothing like the old drum pads which have an electronic-y sound and they look like a kit.They are called Roland v drums.Having said that if you only practice at certain times the neighbours should be ok and you can get rubber practice pads.Why don't you send him to a few lessons as drums is one of those things that people think are really easy and they often give up when they realise it is quite a skill.My dp advises his pupils parents not to buy a kit and to let them practice rudiments with sticks and a rubber pad on a pillow.If they show real interest and/or talent then buy a kit HTH

snorkle Thu 18-May-06 10:31:53

Message withdrawn

BearintheBigBlueHouse Thu 18-May-06 10:46:49

tbh you'd be much better off buying second hand from a drum shop than getting that kit - the quality will be much better and you can usually rely on the shop's advice rather than buying off the internet.

Yamaha DTX electronic kits are great and cheaper (esp 2nd hand) than the Roland V drums. I have one and it's great for the nighbours, who have just got an old second hand acoustic kit which is the bane of my life AND I'M A DRUMMER!!!!

if space is an issue Arbiter Flats Lite kits are great - they sound and feel just like playing regular drums but have no shells so pack away into two bags and even when they're set up, they take up much less room than a regular kit - you could probably find one on eBay for around the £160 mark - I had one I sold for £180 still in really good nick. Just stick Arbiter Flats Lite into an eBay search - there are loads there

lessons are the way to go and I agree with noddyholder about starting off with one practice pad and a couple of sticks - wish I'd done it that way

wannaBe1974 Thu 18-May-06 13:54:57

my mum always had a saying "you can have whatever you want as long as you can plug headphones into it". Luckily for her I play keyboards, lol. If your ds is serious I would let him buy one, but tbh I'd let him save till he can afford a decent one as, if he gets on well he'll want a new/better one before he can afford it.

The electronic kits are much improved on the older versions, and are less of an issue for the neighbours. Someone had a drum kit who lived about 4 streets away from us and on a day when the wind was blowing in the right direction we could hear him practicing so I shudder to think what it must have been like for his neighbours.

yumsymumsy Thu 18-May-06 13:59:03

Oh absolutely dear!!!!!!!!!!!!!! These things do have to be encouraged don't they!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Now my 5 are just musical geniuses if I do say so myself!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! No recorders for them, they went straight to the violin, piano and other such classical instruments!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! We have built a special soundproof room for them at the back of the house so they can practise to their hearts content!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Well, you have to don't you??????? Otherwise they would become like that common family up the road who's only talents are stealing cars!!!!!!!! No offence to any commoners on here of course!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

snorkle Thu 18-May-06 14:30:20

Message withdrawn

trinityrhino Thu 18-May-06 19:28:40

yumsy mumsy makes me wet my pants laughing

BearintheBigBlueHouse Thu 18-May-06 20:25:27

I just wish she'd stick to her own threads - anyroadup - something else came to mind - the Arbiter Flats Lites are also really good for children because, as they've got no shells, the toms can be hung low over the bass/kick drum and are therefore more reachable by non-adult-sized arms. I know buying stuff like this off eBay may worry some people, but the market for them on there is such that if it's just a fad round your house, you can sell them on again for virtually the same price.

Second-hand kits - look for Pearl or Premier or Mapex at the reasonable end of the market and avoid Stagg, Ion, Cannon or Performance Percussion - they're typcally sold as starter kits and are OK if bought new, but they aren't best built, so once thrashed they're not much cop.

Best of luck - hope you've got the next Phil Collins on your hands, not that I'd like to be Phil Collins, but I wouldn't mind his bank balance.

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, watch threads, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now »

Already registered? Log in with: