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Environappy consusion.

(9 Posts)
Dannyboy Thu 22-Feb-07 21:29:25

ok, I'm a newbie so apologies if this has been already discussed to death, but we seem to have tried all types of reusables, biodegradeable disposables etc and the bottom line (scuse the pun!) is that we prefer disposables, but want to source the most environmentally frendly nappies out there at the best price. My question is, does anyone agree that Moltex doesn't actually state they are biodegrabeable at all, merely that they use an unbleached cellulose core. ok, so that ticks boxes of course (I think!) and they're generally considered to be the most env friendly disposables, but it doesn't actually biodegrade quicker than any others does it? 'Nature babycar' claim to be 70% bio-degr, but I wonder how this compares against Pampers or Huggies? Perhaps they are 60% bio-degradable?? Any thoughts? (btw, are dad's allowed on mumsnet?)

NappiesGalore Thu 22-Feb-07 21:35:57

hi DB. yes dads allowed.
dont know the answers to any of your questions... but am curious (in an oh so tired of even looking at nappies, could happily live without ever spending another second thinking about them, sort of way) to hear the answers...

Loopymumsy Thu 22-Feb-07 21:39:03

Message withdrawn

issyissyissy Thu 22-Feb-07 21:39:36

I used nature boy nappies as they were 70% but am not sure what the others were, just thought they cant be much otherwise they would be advertising their own %. Not good logic really but seemed ok at the time!
I used the bags too and they certainly seemed to start degrading qicker than any other bag, normally before they got to the dustbin.
I am also new to mn but think anyone can join, it is supposed to be a parenting site rather than just mums.

makesachange Fri 23-Feb-07 09:08:39

Hi,

Pampers and Huggies are around 30% biodegradeable.

Tushies are the most bio nappies are they have virtually no plastic in, and no SAP (super absorbant polymer). They are bleached but I'm not sure how.

Moltex are the only ones AFAIK which are completely unbleached. They contain very little SAP and are virtually completely bio (just take off the sticky tabs and front plastic strip).

Bambo are bleached with oxygen, not chlorine, which is better, but not as good as unbleached. They are about as bio as Moltex.

Nature Babies (NATY) are about 70-80% bio (they have changed the make up of them) and are bleached, but I can't remember how.

NO NAPPIES biodegrade properly in landfill. Unfortunately, landfill stops the good bio processes for various chemical reasons. Therefore if you definately want to go for dispies, then consider:

- Initial environmental impacts of the manufacture of the nappy (Moltex and Bambo known to be excellent and I'm sure that NATY and Tushies are great, too).
- How well they work (Tushies are too bulky for my liking)
- How well your child's skin copes (my DS only gets on with Moltex - others may be different)
- Price

However, if you're complosting them (full or part time) then go for Tushies or Moltex. Both do so successfully IN THE RIGHT CONDITIONS.

Bear in mind that not only are nappies with a high plastic content bad for the environment, they're also bad for baby's health - especially little boys - so going for eco dispies are worth the extra for sure.

I did a whole report on this last year for a magazine having interviewed Pampers and all the other eco brands (Huggies wouldn't talk to me). Must publish it on my website. If anyone's interested I can email it - let me know by emailing me via www.makesachange.co.uk

Emma

Dannyboy Fri 23-Feb-07 11:31:15

Thanks guys, some great feedback here. It really is quite literally a 'can of worms' if I'm to bio-degrade them properly! Thanks Emma, would def like to see your article. I guess unless you go the whole hog and embark on the challenge of putting up with a steaming pile of pooey nappies at the end of the garden (which I don't) the degradable aspect of them is perhaps not as important as the actual manufacture process. Interesting. Hadn't really considered this part. Still undecided though. Going to visit the baby show in London next weekend - hope to pick up some more advice and some free samples! Issysissy - know what you mean, that was my logic too, so good to get some facts from Emma. I'm alwats sceptical of marketing claims like 70% bio-degradable, as for all I know Pampers could have been 60% Biof-D, so helpul to know. Thanks!

makesachange Fri 23-Feb-07 18:04:39

Hi,

Nay probs. I'll get the article on t'website when I get two secs and will post ref it.

If you want Moltex samples let me know. We also have flushable wipes and bio nappy bags to go with them. They're my fav but the others are excellent too, for various good reasons. NATY are a bit cheaper and easy to get hold of in Boots, for instance.

Oh and don't forget the great eco pull ups you can get. Bambo Training pants are very good. Spirit of Nature stock them, and other websites, too.

Emma

purplesal Sat 24-Feb-07 19:05:52

You could try weenee pads - the only disposable nappy that DOES biodegrade as it contains no plastic whatsoever, unlike all the others. Weenee pads are like big maternity pads that you put inside one of their pouched wraps, although I have heard some peole have had success with a rikki wrap or other tight fitting gusseted wrap.

They decompose completely in a compost bin or a wormery and if you tear them they can even be flushed down the loo. I haven't been brave enough to flush down my loo but I did put one in a bucket of water and it just dissolved into fluff - very impressive.

The pouch pants are extremely slim fitting and come in a huge range of colours. Available through www.teamlollipop.co.uk

makesachange Sun 25-Feb-07 18:06:56

Oh yes, I'd forgotten Weenees. They are perfectly safe to flush in most systems (not sure about septic tanks) although you need to do them in two goes. They also compost absolutely brilliantly.

I don't think you save a lot of time/effort over cloth as you still need to wash the pants, but there you go.

I also found they leaked a lot but I think that's because it's one pad between the legs like a prefold rather than a shape around the body like a conventional sposie or a shaped cloth.

Emma

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