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Lorna Wing Centre?

(12 Posts)
isobel09 Sun 29-Sep-19 16:07:32

Hey. Does anyone know - if you have an NHS referral and go private for an quicker result, if one can still progress with the NHS referral?
I got diagnosed last week at age 46 (waiting for a 1.5 year NHS wait list my GP referred me into), in advance - as my daughter has an NHS ASC assessment this week - so thought be good to get my outcome to feed into this?
So I'm happy to inform my GP of my diagnosis, but I still want to be NHS assessed. Is this possible?

Also, will my private assessment (all legit and pukka) be recognised within the NHS?
Thanks so much!

Blorb Thu 26-Sep-19 22:06:06

Yep similar to Mary but mine took around 5 months from me making initial contact to assessment day (and getting diagnosed).

Mary19 Wed 25-Sep-19 17:37:03

I had my assessment there. I mailed them. They then sent me some forms to fill in to assess if I should be assessed.. I was then given an appointment. In all took about 2 months. Cost £1900 and used DISCO rather than ADOS.

liz7160 Wed 25-Sep-19 05:31:16

Hi ,

I want to find out does anyone know how I get adults assessment done privately at lorna wing and how much please? I've had my youngest child diagnosed about 7 years ago and whilst there she told me about my other daughter . All NHs doctors say is no funding

Nikephorus Fri 11-May-18 12:44:30

Congrats on the diagnosis! (And ditto on the 'grieving' side)

RubyRiddle Fri 11-May-18 09:33:27

Sorry to hear you struggle a little with your diagnosis toffee. I think the fact that I've spent so many years supporting my DDs probably helps me to see it in a different light - both are thriving (eg older DD has a highly paid job that is almost cookie-cutter perfect for her particular blend of strengths, skills and interests, while not requiring her to be 'sociable' etc), & although both obviously have their own challenges, it's just been a question of ensuring they've got the self-awareness & skills/tools to deal with those challenges, and accept that they'll always have certain limitations/ differences compared to NTs. After a night's sleep, this morning I'm mostly feeling both vindicated & validated, though also quite sad - feels a little like grieving for 'what might have been' if I'd had my struggles recognised for what they were when as young as my DDs. One thing the consultant said to me yesterday that may be worth bearing in mind when seeking counselling/CBT etc was to emphasise that ASD is now my 'primary diagnosis' - I have prior diagnoses of anxiety & depression, but was told that these are now what she called 'secondary diagnoses', and that it's important that any support/ interventions (eg therapy) for these secondary conditions should always be informed by the fact that my primary diagnosis is autism - ie should only be seen by people who have training/ knowledge/ experience of working with autistic clients, as interventions for NT people can cause more harm than good (which matches my experiences of seeking help with my mental health so far!) Good luck finding help for your self-esteem issues , as well as peace with your diagnosis.

toffee1000 Fri 11-May-18 04:02:17

Well done on the diagnosis. Sorry to hear about the abuse, that must have been horrific.
It was definitely an odd feeling to have my diagnosis confirmed. I'm still not entirely comfortable with it; I have self-esteem issues and can often only see the negative side of my ASD. It's not gonna be easy to get hold of, but I'm really hoping for some form of counselling/CBT just to chat things through and to hopefully change my views to more positive ones.

RubyRiddle Fri 11-May-18 01:50:19

Hi, thanks for your replies - had my assessment today. It took much longer than the 3 hours I'd been told to expect, due to me having experienced quite a lot of abuse growing up (my 'different' behaviours were seen as deliberate naughtiness, and over the years the punishments meted out became increasingly severe, morphing into downright sadism at times) - it took quite a lot of exploring to tease out the impacts of the trauma I experienced from innate autistic traits, which was challenging given how hard I've always tried to mask & camouflage, and be 'normal', out of fear of further rejection etc. But end result is that I've got a letter in front of me stating "In summary, it was concluded that *** does meet the criteria for a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) as seen in women". Was told I should get the first draft of the report in 4 weeks. Think it's going to take a while to sink in fully, but mostly I just feel like I've finally been seen for who I actually am for the first time in my entire life!

toffee1000 Fri 04-May-18 16:37:41

Yes, the DISCO tool is basically a long interview/chat, starting off with childhood and then ongoing chronologically. It was five and a half hours from start to diagnosis, although this did include a lunch break.

Fobber Fri 04-May-18 08:32:02

I was diagnosed there last year. I went privately straight away because I had a gut feeling I wouldn't be taken seriously by the NHS on account of seeming "normal" generally (eye contact, articulate, married, mother, professional job, seemingly put together...).

My husband came with me and it was all very relaxed. The clinician used the DISCO tool - basically a chat. Took about 3 hours, and the Dr told me that, yes, in her opinion, I have high functioning autism (Aspergers profile).

She then sent me the draft assessment, which I was able to amend and return to her. Final diagnostic letter in the post about 6 weeks later.

I felt an enormous relief initially, then have had my ups and downs since (it's been 13 months). Knowing is good but life is still hard - and I've lost someone who I thought was a dear friend as they couldn't understand / deal with me knowing I am autistic (or "have autism" as they insist on person first language as they work with SEN children).

I know my daughter is similar - currently battling the ignorant attitudes you mention in her primary school!

Good luck, hope you get the outcome you want! thanks

AutisticHedgehog Thu 03-May-18 22:52:46

I wasn't assessed at Lorna Wing but when I was researching like crazy what I could expect at my assessment, the general opinion I encountered was that it's best not to know - there is no need to prepare for specific tests - it's best to be spontaneous.

But I did have copious amounts of notes that supported why I believed I had Asperger's.

I hope you get the outcome you want (which I presume is a diagnosis)

RubyRiddle Wed 02-May-18 17:57:34

Any women on here been assessed for autism at the Lorna Wing Centre? I've got my assessment (privately funded) next week, and I've really no idea what to expect, except that I've been told it will take roughly half a day. Oldest DD is very clearly on the spectrum, but didn't realise until she was a teenager, as her behaviour always seemed so 'normal' to me grin - so far, she's decided against pursuing a diagnosis. My 16 yo DD was diagnosed aged 8, and I've tried to get an assessment for myself through the NHS 3 or 4 times since without being taken seriously, hence paying for a private assessment. I decided to self-refer to the Lorna Wing, as from what I understand they're specialists in assessing for ASD in women & girls, whereas both GPs & the NHS psychiatrist I spoke to seemed almost completely ignorant about how different ASD can be in us, compared to boys or men. Now that it's finally going to happen, would be good to have some idea of what to expect, as I've read they use different assessment tools than my younger DD's consultant did?

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