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Am I heading for it? May have TMI!

(7 Posts)
CarpeJugulum Tue 26-Jul-16 08:00:02

I know you can't diagnose over the Internet, but I'd like to know if it's worthwhile popping to see the GP at this point or whether I should just soldier on with things? And am hoping you wise women can give me a clue as to where to start what they can do if I do go please?!

I've just been investigated at the local breast clinic due to sudden onset of nipple discharge. They done tests (blood tests and scans) and concluded that there is nothing nasty lurking which is a relief.
However, in passing the consultant mentioned that it may be hormonal charges causing the issue.

Now, I'm due my period in the next day or so (we do use contraception so hoping I don't have to pee on a stick!), but assuming that everything arrives as normal, I'm now wondering about whether or not I'm heading for the menopause?

- I'm struggling to lose weight
- I'm tired (not exhausted, just unmotivated and I can nap for Britain)
- grumpy
- headachy more often (which may be hay fever related but no other symptoms)
- I'm quite dry and itchy down there (no thrush etc, just feeling it's not as normal as usual)
- last few periods have had a lot more discomfort than normal but still same flow and duration

For the record I'm almost 40 and I know my DM was menopausal earlier than the recommended age; but I'm not concerned about an early onset and wouldn't try to stop it. That being said, I like knowing what's happening IYSWIM?

So, menopause or not? GP or not?

PollyPerky Tue 26-Jul-16 13:07:47

Try not to worry. The 'rule' is to chart your periods for about 6 months as erratic cycles are the first sign, as well as other symptoms. But bear in mind you can have anovular cycles that are regular too. The dryness and itching sounds like classic vaginal dryness /atrophy and if nothing else, you should have a chat with your GP and maybe try some weak oestrogen cream there - it's not absorbed into the system- and is safe. You ought to tell them about your mum's early menopause as it's hereditary. You can't fo anything to stop the menopause but if you are menopausal before 45, the NICE guidelines suggest HRT to prevent bone loss and possible heart problems later.

PeppasNanna Tue 26-Jul-16 13:14:55

I had many of the symptons plus a suddenly very erratic cycle.
Went to the GP. She did blood tests. Said everything was 'normal'.

That was it. Im 43 so thought even if i could get some medication for the symptoms it would help. But nothing.

Good luck.

PollyPerky Tue 26-Jul-16 13:48:19

There is a report in today's Times (pg 17) with the heading 'Early menopause speeds up ageing process and increases disease risk'. The research was done by the University of California by Prof Horvath.
It's based on meno before age 40 but in the UK early meno is also classed as 40-45.

Blood tests are unreliable - you need at least 2, on days 2-5 of each cycle. Even if they show no meno and you have symptoms , you should ask / demand HRT and if it helps then that was what was needed!

JapanNextYear Tue 26-Jul-16 14:13:09

PeppasNanna - I had to go back to the GPs 3 times till if got HRT - started at 36 and they said I was 'too young' so I put up with a lot of unnecessary discomfort.

Go back! and take the NICE guidelines on menopause with you!

I'm now on pill rather than HRT - but same sort of benefits.

CarpeJugulum Tue 26-Jul-16 15:45:22

Well, I'm 38 (nearly 39), so yes it would be early. Period should have shown up this morning but no sign so I'm now being slightly concerned... <sigh> however I was stressed this weekend due to guests being here (long story!) so odds are it's that causing it.

humblesims Tue 02-Aug-16 16:24:10

Many of the symptoms you describe can be explained by thyroid imbalance. It is quite often at this age that GPs diagnose it as women present with it thinking its menopause (which it could be too, of course).

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