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Insomnia! Screwing with my life!

(13 Posts)
Erebus Tue 14-Jan-14 19:08:08

I am 50 and perimenopausal.

The biggie for me is insomnia. I work 3 days a week; on the other two, I often have to see the family (2 DSs, 12 & 14) and DH) off to work- and take to my bed for a 2 hour sleep catch-up! I do this because I have Things To Do and as such, know I'll be better off functioning reasonably well through a shortened day (with a 10-10.30am 'wake-up') than getting up, in mortal 'pain' at 7.15am and dragging myself through the day, exhausted. Whilst recognising that tonight will be just as bad! And yes, I exercise when I can! 3 mile walk today. Hot bath, no caffeine blah, blah.

I have discovered over the past few years that I'm either In the Mood or Not to do everyday stuff. As in - willingly (and sometimes happily and with enthusiasm!) able to take tasks on, or not. If I wake utterly NOT in the mood, I just can't start, be it cleaning, shopping, sorting, organising. I must add that I do the barest necessary so the house is clean enough and there's food on the table, but if there's anything else that needs doing- nah, if I'm not in the mood. I mean, not 'don't really feel like it' aka 'Princess', more 'can't face it', just can't start the task; so insomnia really affects my day to day functioning!

I have found, interestingly, when I try to sleep that I actually can't switch off. I try and adopt relaxation techniques as I lie in bed at 1am, 2 am, but it's almost as if my conscious splits; one half trying, the other observing, criticising and hijacking. Part of me is going 'om' as I focus on progressive relaxation; the other is going 'yeah, right, do yer worst- but what did Michele mean when she said that to Sharon today?'- which is maybe better than the catastophising it does by 4am, still awake. What if?...

The tragic thing is, on keeping a 'sleep diary'- I find that it's the evenings when, to put it bluntly, I've got hammered (3/4 bottle wine over an evening) when I wake at 7-8am having had what feels like a great night's sleep! Eight complete hours sleep! Imagine!

Just venting here, sorry!

Jaffacakesallround Wed 15-Jan-14 08:18:54

I sympathise. Are you looking for suggestions or just offloading?

Ledkr Wed 15-Jan-14 08:28:21

Sleeping tablets are your friend.
I take 10m amyltriptaline which does the trick.

Jaffacakesallround Wed 15-Jan-14 11:43:15

Ami is not a sleeping tablet- it's an antidepressant which can be used in small doses- below 75mgs- for pain relief. No dr would give you this for insomnia- it's sedation effect is a side effect of its main use.

Ledkr Wed 15-Jan-14 14:39:22

I know that Jaffa. It it's really helped me to sleep and in such low doses too. 5-10 ( I bite it in half if I'm up early the next day) I initially had it for pain relief but it's had such a positive effect on my sleep/life that it's worth talking to the dr surely?

Jaffacakesallround Wed 15-Jan-14 15:16:28

But a dr would be behaving irresponsibly if he prescribed something that wasn't the right drug for the condition.
Drs will give sleeping pills - for about a week.
The reason for lack of sleep in menopause is lack of oestrogen. Supplementing that is one option.

Erebus Wed 15-Jan-14 18:14:34

Thanks- just offloading, really!

I recall when the GP would dish out Temaz with gay abandon. It was great! grin- No, when I were a young 'un I used to do a crazy shift pattern as a HCP and we were all on low dose Temaz (as in 'only when we needed it')- admittedly, our shifts were a bit brutal, 28 hour shifts at a go, once a week, so no consistency!

I am wondering whether I should be having a chat with the GP? I mean, currently I'm functioning pretty well with my 'catch up' sleeps but they're only possible because I have a supportive DH and, if I wake again at 10.30 or 11am, I am a dervish of activity to make up for the time I 'lost' asleep. If I were a single mum, working full time, I wouldn't be coping at all.

Though if DH didn't snore for England- and if he didn't sleep for England as well! If he's still awake 3 minutes after his head has hit the pillow, he's 'had a bad night'. If I'm asleep 2 hours after lights-out, I consider it a triumph!

Didn't know it was the oestrogen drop off. Can you supplement that with natural products?

Jaffacakesallround Thu 16-Jan-14 08:43:59

Google phytoestrogens from soya and pulses- some women think they help but there is no real scientific evidence to back it up. Natural bioidentical oestrogen is available on the NHS as HRT.

Jaffacakesallround Thu 16-Jan-14 08:47:55

you might find this good reading

BMj

LordEmsworth Thu 16-Jan-14 08:48:52

A while ago I saw an acupuncturist for insomnia / sleep deprivation, and I think it really helped - it might have been coincidence but my sleep started to (slowly) improve at the same time. Maybe worth a go if you can afford it?

summertimeandthelivingiseasy Thu 16-Jan-14 14:06:13

I fell asleep about 6.30am this morning/last night. Feel awful, like half my brain is missing.

It just happens out of the blue, so hard to prepare for.

I have just started a period so maybe it is the oestrogen. Also, I had a very stressy day.

Hopefully, I will be out like a light tonight hmm

willyhaschips Fri 17-Jan-14 20:04:02

I have had terrible trouble sleeping since starting with the perimenopause. Am now on HRT and it's relieving all my symptoms....except the insomnia! Grrrr sad( so surely it can't just be lack of oestrogen can it????

Longsuffering2 Fri 28-Feb-14 17:15:10

Dear Erebus,
Go and buy The Effortless Sleep method by Sasha Stephens - and throw away your (sorry!) stupid sleep diary - you are obsessing and making your problem worse. Buy some silk sheets from John Lewis to help with heat control. Follow the Sleep Guide and you will recover - for good. I did. Stop coming on this site obsessing your problem. But do come back on to tell us how well you are doing on your road to recovery. I don't get royalties, but am a fervent believer.

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