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Please come and give me advice about managing practically/financially on my own

(11 Posts)
HotBrickOfJizz Sun 04-Nov-12 10:34:15

I will be separating from 'D'H in the next couple of months, don't really want to speak about the reasons for this but be assured he is a bellend and I have to manage this separation in a planned way in order to achieve the best outcome in the future for DS and I (DH is very unreliable with money and I want his name off everything, rather than risk being impacted on by any debts he runs up in the future).

I can take H's name off the joint mortgage in January. He has agreed to doing this and hopefully he won't change his mind before then. My mum has agreed to put her name to the mortgage instead as a temporary arrangement so that I can continue to stay in the house. I will continue to pay the mortgage alone, which I do already.

I have my own bank account. This account pays all the bills and always has done. We have a joint account which H's wages go into. H is a low earner and his wages cover food/petrol/clothes for DS - anything that isn't a bill. Should I take my name off this account now? I am worried that H will just spend up to the overdraft limit if I wasn't behind him managing the account, and I would be clearing the overdraft but getting nowhere forever.

DS is 7 months old and my mum provides childcare (she is a brilliant support). I work 30 hours per week condensed into 3 days. I earn 1300 per month after deductions. Household bills which can't be reduced any further at the moment come to about 1200 per month. I'm going to have to get a second job aren't I? Really don't want to sell up and move back to my parent's house. I don't think I'm entitled to child tax credit because my income was just over the threshold until earlier this year when I went on maternity leave.

Please tell me what I need to know and what are the important things for me to do? I hope I don't sound too cold about all of this, I'm really not, I just want to make sure my son has a stable future.

OptimisticPessimist Sun 04-Nov-12 11:06:02

How much is your gross wage? If you're earning £1300 net pcm with no deductions other than standard income tax/NI it seems that's about £20k pa gross, is that about right? If so you'll still get some tax credit I should think, and you'll have child benefit too. Entitledto suggests about £44 in tax credits per week on £20k, and £20 per week child benefit. You should also be able to claim a 25% discount on your council tax.

HotBrickOfJizz Sun 04-Nov-12 11:17:38

Thanks for replying, I have been on the tax credits calculator and because my income was over the threshold 2011-12 it says I'm not entitled, but Moneysavingexpert's calculator outcome was £25 per week because my income has dropped by over £2500. It's so confusing. I'm hoping I can find about £80 per week somehow for diesel, clothes for DS and the food shop etc.

RedHelenB Sun 04-Nov-12 11:37:29

Maintenance from dad as well.

5madthings Sun 04-Nov-12 11:53:14

get in touch with gingerbread the organisation for single parents, they will know all you are entitled to etc and they are really helpful, they have a website and a number you can call smile

you can pay the lower rate council tax for a single adult household as well, its normally 25% less so that will help a bit.

and on that income i would say you should be entitled to some tax credits once you are a single parent.

speak to gingerbread they are great!

purpleroses Sun 04-Nov-12 14:02:18

Tax credits
Child benefit
Council tax single person reduction
Child maintenance

If that's still not enough to live on you need to increase your earnings somehow - longer hours? A lodger? Childminding on the days you're not at work?

DoubleYew Mon 05-Nov-12 00:26:44

Do you think you won't be able to count on his dad for maintenance?

You can make yourself very good at economising if you have to. Once a week we go round charity shops, ds plays with the toys and I look through the kids clothes. You can get some real bargains if you find the right shops and keep an eye on them. I also buy the next size up clothes in the sales so buy fleece sleepsuits for a couple of quid in the spring rather than ten quid in the winter. Same with wrapping paper, crackers for next christmas. There are some great threads on here for online bargains for gift giving and food budgeting. All these little things add up to give you that extra cushion of money in case of the unexpected.

Have you got in touch with CAB? They should be able to help with tax credits situation etc.

DoubleYew Mon 05-Nov-12 00:33:18

I have a distant memory that when you are on maternity leave it does something to your tax credits entitlement, they take X amount off each week you were on leave, so you actually earned less in their eyes than you did in reality. This gave me more tax credits than I was expecting but I only found out through chance as they do not seem to advertise it. So definately apply once you are single.

Try and agree contact amicabley (not easy if he is a bellend...) so it doesn't end up costing you financially and emotionally to get it sorted.

theredhen Mon 05-Nov-12 06:42:41

Why are you saying your income has dropped by 2500? Are you including your husbands salary in last years earnings? If you are, you shouldn't be. Tax credits will close your old claim and open a new one and will only include your earnings.

NotALondoner Mon 05-Nov-12 07:46:02

Am I right in thinking you can have tax credits based on your income now rather than last year's?

OptimisticPessimist Mon 05-Nov-12 08:24:44

I was about to say the same thing NotALondoner, I'm sure that if your current year's income is less than the previous year's then they use the lower figure to assess your claim. Also as theredhen says, all previous claims will have included your husband's income, once you are single that claim will be closed and a new claim opened using only your income.

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