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Advice on power of attourney

(5 Posts)
mummydreamer Tue 12-Jul-05 14:23:25

I'm urgently seeking some information about having power of attourney in relation to my terminally ill father - the rights and responsibilities involved etc. Can any one help, please?

mummydreamer Tue 12-Jul-05 14:50:59

bump

QueenEagle Tue 12-Jul-05 14:55:12

dh has PoA if his father dies first and leaves behind his mother, who needs 24 hour care. I'm not sure exactly of all the ins and outs, but I think it means that dh would have the power to make decisions on behalf of his dm with regards to financial matters. I will check with him later and post again if no-one else has 0p0osted in the meantime.

Chickpea Tue 12-Jul-05 18:25:15

Hi MD,
I'm sorry to hear about your father.

Your father could give any person POA if he wished and usually in these circs an Enduring Power of Attorney would be appropriate. He can give power to act on certain matters for example the sale of a property or he can give a general power where all decisions can be made for him.
In the event that he becam mentally unable to deal with his own affairs then the power would continue but would need to be registered at the Court of protection.
The POA is on a set form and is completed according to circumstances. I am a solicitor so feel free to e-mail me if you need more info. Hope this helps

mummydreamer Tue 12-Jul-05 21:56:19

Chickpea and Queen Eagle - thankyou for taking the time to reply. My father and I have been talking about POA as he has rapidly progressing motor neurone disease and is losing his speech functions as well as limb movements. I am less worried about financial matters, more concerned about the medical decisions that will need to be made when he is no longer able to communicate for himself. (This terrifies me really). I thought that a living will might be appropriate - what do you think?

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