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Child contact

(2 Posts)
wirral Tue 11-Sep-07 12:01:06

Hi. I need help. My ex and I are divorced. He left about 18 months ago. We have a 7 year old daughter. Ex works shifts and initially he wanted to see daughter every time he was off work ( admirable but not practical). I took ex to court and access was agreed on a fairly routine basis. Daughter then refused to go to her Dad's midweek overnight so we arranged a newish routine via mediation. Briefly:

Ex picks daughter up from school 3 x a week and returns her at 6.30pm. He also has overnights at weekends when his shifts allow.

Recently when he has daughter he is refusing to bring her back. Initially he telephoned to ask if he could return her late - I refused ( it was her first day back at school and I wanted to see her).Next time he picked her up he texted to say he would be returning her late. He has now emailed me to say that he will be returning her at 7.30pm on Friday.

HELP! I have no objection to a late return if it is an emergency etc but not just because it suits him. It is getting harder and harder to plan things etc. Also it means that our relationship is deteriorating as we keep arguing about the return time.

Do I have any legal recourse? My solicitor is unhelpful to say the least and just says that if we return to court he will just get his wrist slapped etc

BetsyBoop Tue 11-Sep-07 18:28:56

Could you compromise by agreeing a later return when he has her on a Friday, especially if he can't see much of her that w-e due to his shifts - and perhaps in the school holidays too, on the understanding that she MUST be back at the agreed time on a school night? Perhaps pointing out to him that if she is late to bed on a school night her school work will start to suffer, the importance of "routine" etc.

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